Picasso2020 Digital Catalog

PICASSO

“Every act of creation is first of all an act of destruction.”- PICASSO

PICASSO

Pablo Picasso is considered the most pivotal, cutting-edge artist of the 20th century, challenging artistic mediums to attain the optimum results for his artworks. Print- making was a true passion for Picasso, and he was a major innovator in the medium. He consistently altered his methods to achieve unparalleled qualities in his original graphic works. Galerie Michael is proud to present Picasso, an exhibition rich with rare proofs and exceptional prints, some of Picasso’s most defining graphic oeuvre. The works ex- hibited are so unique and of the most important quality, that they cannot fail to have a permanent place in art history. Highlights include an incredibly rare series of Portrait de jeune fille, d’après Cranach le Jeune. II, (1958), considered a 20th century masterpiece, and arguably the most defining color print ever created. For this ambitious undertaking, Picasso made five different linoleum blocks – sepia, yellow, red, blue and black – to be superimposed on each other in that order. He then proceeded to print different proofs, in the pro- cess making different states of the blocks to arrive at the final image. A powerful image with rich colors, evoking a blend of Cubism and classical portraiture, this series is considered the most important of Picasso’s linoleum cuts. Works of this rarity are truly only seen in museum collections. Additionally, Galerie Michael is thrilled to offer two of the finest works from the Vollard Suite, Minotaure aveugle guidé par Marie-Thérèse au pigeon dans une nuit étoilée, (1934) and Minotaure caressant du Mufle la Main d’une Dormeuse, (1933-34). The Vollard Suite comprises 100 etchings completed by Picasso for art dealer Ambroise

Vollard. During this time in his career, Picasso’s personal life was in an upheaval, and in this series, Picasso created and adopted the Minotaur as an alter-ego. The half man, half monster Minotaur became a symbol of his impulses and both a personal and universal duality between good and evil, or an autobiographical metaphor. It is a surprise to no one that not all Picassos are created equal, nor will they ever move toward equality. Among the challenges of dedicated fine art collectors is the shortage of top Picasso original work. Owning original graphics is always a better choice than owning mediocre original drawings or paintings, not only for the short‐ and long‐term aesthetic enjoyment of the viewers, but certainly also for the ultimate investment appreciation and upside. As the price of Picasso’s best originals has skyrocketed into the unobtainable stratosphere, collectors have two choices: they can settle on mediocre originals, or move to top‐quality, and still affordable, multi- ple originals. The choice between the two is obvious, as mediocre work will never significantly rise in value, in direct contrast with his top prints, which are still are somewhat accessible and still present to the collector tremendous price growth. The “secret” to buying art is to buy great works of art at prices that precede up- swings. The upward price curve for Picassos is imminent. Now is the prudent time to purchase Picassos. We at Galerie Michael are privileged to offer our collectors and clients rare artworks that serve as key examples of Pablo Picasso’s artistic testament to the graphic medium. We hope that you can join us to witness the mastery of Picasso for yourself!

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) David, Bethsabée et le Prophète Nathan, 1970 Aquatint, drypoint and scraping on Rives paper Stamp-signed and numbered in pencil From the edition of 50, aside from 15 artist’s proofs and 3 printer’s proofs on Rives paper. The fourth and final state. Printed by Crommelynck. A strong impres- sion with rich shading; a painterly print. Bloch 1876; Baer 1881 IV état B.b. 25 x 27 3/8 inches 915394 SOLD According to the Bible, the prophet Nathan was a court prophet who lived in the time of King David. He came to David to reprimand him for committing adultery with Bathsheba while she was the wife of Uriah the Hittite, whose death David had arranged to hide his transgression. A notorious atheist, only a few dozen pieces out of Picasso’s colossal body of work have Christian themes, making this piece particularly noteworthy and rare in his oeuvre. Picasso often elected to exclude color from his work to emphasize the structural value of form inherent in his art. He possessed an obsessive interest in line, form and tonal values, and developed a complex language of pictorial and sculptural motifs. This piece particularly showcases his mastery of the media. Aldo Crommelynck was one of the most revered printmakers of the 20th century. His creative and technical accomplish- ments in collaboration with Picasso produced some of the most unique impressions in printmaking. These works, from a collector’s standpoint, are highly valuable and represent Picasso’s true artistic testament.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Minotaure caressant du Mufle la Main d’une Dormeuse, 1933-1934 Drypoint on vergé de Montval laid paper Signed and annotated in pencil; inscribed in the plate From the Vollard Suite. An exceptional impression from the edition of 260. Picasso expert Brigitte Baer’s second and final state. With Vollard watermark. Aside from an edition of 50 on vergé de Montval paper with wide margins and Montgolfier watermark, an edition of 3 on parchment, and 3 trial proofs on vergé de Montval paper. Printed by Lacourière, Paris. Bloch 201; Baer 369 II.B.d. 13 1/2 x 17 1/2 inches 915396 ”Minotaure caressant du Mufle la Main d’une Dor- meuse,” from the Vollard Suite, marks one of Picas- so’s first uses of the Minotaur in his artworks. It was created in his Boisgeloup studio, and the woman is his lover, Marie-Thérèse Walter. Crouching over the sleeping woman, the Minotaur is both a brutal and intimate presence, revealing two sides of his nature. When Picasso later invited Françoise Gilot to view the Vollard Suite etchings in the privacy of his studio in 1943, he remarked of the Minotaur in this print: ‘He’s studying her, trying to read her thoughts... try- ing to decide whether she loves him because he’s a monster... It’s hard to say whether he wants to wake her or kill her.’ (Françoise Gilot and Carlton Lake, Life with Picasso, New York Review of Books, 2019 [reprint of 1964 McGraw-Hill edition], 42.) Fifteen prints from the Vollard Suite, one hundred etchings completed by Picasso in 1937 for art dealer Ambroise Vollard, show the Minotaur as an autobi- ographical metaphor. The half man, half monster became a symbol of his impulses and both a person- al and universal duality between good and evil. The Minotaur is consistently portrayed as both violent and tender, simultaneously dominating women and being tamed by them. The Vollard Suite comprises 100 etchings made at a critical point in Picasso’s career between 1930 and 1937. Exploring themes of mythology, identity, creativity and sexuality, the Vollard Suite is etched in a neoclassical style that Picasso adapted from his studies of classical sculpture and traces his artistic development throughout the 1930s. In the series, Picasso eroticizes the relationship between the artist, model, and art, and casts himself throughout.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Minotaure aveugle guidé par Marie-Thérèse au pigeon dans une nuit étoilée, 1934 Aquatint and drypoint on vergé de Montval laid paper Signed and inscribed in pencil From the Vollard Suite. An exceptional impression from the edition of 260. Picasso expert Brigitte Baer’s fourth and final state. With Picasso watermark and ‘Galatea’ watermark. Aside from an edition of 50 on vergé de Montval paper with wide margins and Montgolfier watermark, an edition of 4 on parchment, and 3 trial proofs on vergé de Montval paper. Printed by Lacourière, Paris. Bloch 225; Baer 437 IV.B.d. 13 3/8 x 17 5/8 inches 915395 Picasso adopted the Minotaur as an alter-ego. Fifteen prints from the Vollard Suite, one hundred etchings completed by Picasso in 1937 for art dealer Ambroise Vollard, show the Minotaur as an autobiographi- cal metaphor. It was during this time that Picasso’s personal life was in an upheaval. His affair with the 17-year-old Marie-Thérèse Walter had come to light, and the relationship with his wife Olga Khokhlova was coming to an end. The half man, half monster Mino- taur became a symbol of his impulses and both a personal and universal duality between good and evil. The Minotaur is consistently portrayed as both violent and tender, simultaneously dominating women and being tamed by them. This is illustrated in the present scene, ”Minotaure aveugle guidé par Marie-Thérèse au pigeon dans une nuit étoilée” (Blind Minotaur Guided by Marie-Thérèse with Pigeon in a Starry Night), in which the young Marie-Thérèse is holding a dove while leading the blind Minotaur through the darkness. Although typically driven by desire and violent urges, he is completely under her control, and responds to her kind innocence. As the decade wore on, the rise of dictatorships and personal conflicts added to the stress of Picasso’s life. His depictions of the minotaur became darker, with the creature wounded or blind. In the present piece we can see a precursor to Guernica, 1937 (Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid), Picasso’s best-known epic of violence and suffering, painted only three years later. The Vollard Suite comprises 100 etchings made at a critical point in Picasso’s career between 1930 and 1937. Exploring themes of mythology, identity, cre- ativity and sexuality, the Vollard Suite is etched in a neoclassical style that Picasso adapted from his studies of classical sculpture and traces his artistic development throughout the 1930s. In the series, Picasso eroticizes the relationship between the artist, model and art. .

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Buste de profil, 1957 Lithograph on Arches paper Signed lower right in red pencil, annotated lower left in pencil; dated in the plate A rare artist’s proof, outside of the numbered edition of 50. First state of three. Printed by Mourlot, Paris. Published by Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris. With full margins. Bloch 845; Mourlot 306 26 x 20 inches 915327 Picasso met Jacqueline Roque in 1953. She would become his wife in 1961, and served as his final inspira- tion and muse. In Picasso’s later years, Jacqueline was the most important and frequently portrayed figure in Picasso’s work, always dignified and beautiful, with elegant and fluid lines. Picasso was able to maintain a brilliant balance between the medium and subject, capturing volume, texture and emotion. In this medium, he is able to masterfully create a ”painterly print,” portraying color with values in tones and gradations of black and white. While extremely difficult for most artists to execute, for Picasso it was child’s play. A strong example of Picasso’s proficiency of the graphic medium, this piece showcases the regal beauty of his wife and muse. With rich tones and contrasts, Jacqueline is strikingly beautiful as she gazes forward with a tranquil yet adoring expression on her face. She is shown in profile, a classic Mediterranean beauty, evok- ing feelings of serenity and luminosity that symbolize his great love for her.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Petit déjeuner sur l’herbe, d’après Manet, 1962 Linoleum cut printed in colors on Arches wove paper Signed and dedicated in black ink One of approximately twenty artist’s proofs. Aside from the edition of fifty. Published by Galerie L. Leiris, Paris. Printed by Arnéra, Vallauris. Provenance: Yvonne Zervos (1905-1970), Paris (gallery owner, collector and wife of Christian Zervos, an influential art critic, collector, publisher and scholar), presumably a gift from the artist; René Char (1907-1988), Paris (French poet and member of the French Resistance);

presumably a gift from the above; Bernard Moustrou (?-1991), Avignon;

Private Collection, UK Bloch 1096; Baer 1328 24 3/4 x 17 1/2 inches 915171

Throughout his career, Picasso often went back to visit the works of Old Master artists: Cranach, Poussin, Velasquez, Rembrandt, David, Delacroix and Courbet, among others. His experiment with Édouard Manet’s painting, ”Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe” (1862-1863) was, without a doubt, the most profound and the most com- plex he undertook. Of all the works Picasso selected for his ”variations,” Manet’s ”Luncheon on the Grass” was the nearest to him chronologically. This painting had still not shaken off the scandalous reputation it had attracted at the Salon des Refusés in 1863. The Musée d’Orsay commented that ”Manet’s refusal to conform to convention and his initiation of a new freedom from traditional subjects and modes of representation – can perhaps be considered as the departure point for Modern Art.’ Manet took his inspiration from Titian’s ”Fête champêtre,” c. 1509, currently in the Musée du Louvre, Paris, and from the engraving by Marcantonio Raimondi (after Raphael) The Judgement of Paris, c. 1510-1520, currently in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Pablo Picasso, as with numerous artists before and after him, was awestruck by the piece, so much so that later in his career, he spent three obsessive years working and reworking variations on the piece, making some 150 sketches, 27 paintings, 18 models for sculptures and three linoleum cuts based on Manet’s origi- nal work. It seems only appropriate that from one father of a new artistic heritage to another pioneer of Mod- ern Art in Europe, ”Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe” should forge the reputation of the first, while being subsequently forged further into the popular imagination through the eccentric reinventions of the other. This elaborate subject marked between tradition and modernism has been ”appropriated” by Picasso in or- der to continue a dialogue between subjects and artists from different areas.

As an artist, Picasso was influenced by music, which played an important part of the culture of his native Spain. Picasso loved the music and pageantry of bullfights, as well as the traditional carnivals and fairs of Catalonia. These were recurring themes, sub- jects of many of his artworks. Here, Picasso showcases his mastery of linoleum cutting techniques, specifically with the reduction method. This progressive proof traces the sequence, color exploration and printing process by which Pi- casso created his linoleum cut images, showing the development of the image into its final form.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) L’Aubade, avec femme dans un fauteuil, 1959 Linoleum cut printed in colors on heavy wove paper Stamp signed lower right A unique and rare proof in chocolate and caramel. Picasso expert Brigitte Baer’s first state of two. Aside from the edition of 50. Inscribed and dated ”Pre- mier Etat-[Unique] 17.9.59” by the printer in pencil. Printed by Imprimerie Arnéra, Vallauris. Published by Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris. Provenance: Imprimerie Arnéra, Vallauris; The artist; By descent to his granddaughter, Marina Picasso, with her collection stamp verso, number 52585; Gal- erie Michael, Beverly Hills Exhibition History: ”Picasso: Master Printmaker”, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, 2005, No.61

Bloch 917; Baer 1232 I. 23 1/2 x 31 3/8 inches 914533 .

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Picador, 1959

Linoleum cut printed in colors on watermarked Arches paper Inscribed by the printer ‘le 7-10-59 à tirer/1ère épreuve/5-10-59’ A rare proof before the edition of 50 published by Galerie Louise Leiris, 1960. Printed by Arnéra. An inscription by Hidalgo Arnéra indicated this was the first impression taken from the plate. Picasso expert Brigitte Baer records three such impressions in brown over a light brown background. Ink stamp verso, “Im- primerie Arnéra Archives/Non Signé”.

Bloch 909; Baer 1226.I 20 7/8 x 25 1/4 inches 600003

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Le départ, 1951 Lithograph on Arches paper Dated in the plate upper right

An exceptionally rare impression with full margins. A trial print of the first state, which would later be print- ed in red. According to Picasso experts Felix Reuße and Ulrike Gauss, only one trial print in black exists, in addition to five artist proofs in red. This print is now the second known. The first state of ten. Mourlot calls for five proofs of each state except the eighth, as well as a signed and numbered edition of fifty in the final state. Printed by Mourlot, Paris. Bloch 686; Mourlot 201 15 x 22 1/4 inches 915301 With a painterly tequnique and a touch of humor, Picasso reconstructs a glimpse of medieval times. A knight on horesback and a page are whimsically rendered departing a city as townspeople look on. Particular attention has been paid to the knight’s armor and horse’s costume. Picasso uses a lighthearted blend of Modernism and caricature to create this playful spectacle.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Sur le Scene: Vieillard Barbu S’Appretant a Poignarder une Femme Dans Son Lit, 1966 Etching and aquatint on paper Stamp signed lower right From the ”60 Series.” One of three proofs before steelfacing and beveling of the plate, apart from the regular edition of 50, plus 15 artist’s proofs. Printed by Crommelynck. Annotated lower left. Bloch 1421; Baer 1449.A 8 3/4 x 12 3/4 inches 911741 Aldo Crommelynck was one of the most revered printmakers of the 20th century. His creative and technical accomplishments in collaboration with Picasso produced some of the most unique impressions in printmaking. These works, from a collector’s standpoint, are highly valuable and represent Picasso’s true artistic testament.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) L’Atelier de Cannes, 1956 Color lithograph on Arches paper Signed and dated in blue crayon; annotated in pencil

A rare proof, printed in the larger format. A strong impression, with colors fresh. Aside from the book edition of 250 executed for the series, ”Dans l’Atelier de Picasso,” with text by Jaime Sabartés. Published and print- ed by Fernand Mourlot, Paris. With full margins. Bloch 794; Mourlot 279; Cramer 88 26 1/8 x 19 7/8 inches 915373 SOLD Jaime Sabartés, Picasso’s friend from their early Barcelona days, became the artist’s secretary and assistant in 1935, and served in this role for thirty years. The text of ”L’Atelier de Cannes” gives some genealogical details about Picasso’s family, reflects on the personality of the artist, quotes lengthy excerpts from their conversations, and relates the story of how the lithographic printer and publisher Fernand Mourlot met Picasso. The book is illus- trated with 30 reproductions of works in Picasso’s studio and six original lithographs. The deluxe edition is accom-panied by seven additional lithographs. This particular work is a rare proof aside from the book edition. During their long friendship, Picasso executed various portraits of Sabartés in different media, many full of irony – an irony mixed with jokes and affection, which was the basis of their friendship. Some of these art- works can be found in the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow, the Museu Picasso, Barcelona, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, among others.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) El Entierro del Conde de Orgaz: Au théâtre: Le Cocu brandissant le , avec L’Aigle du dit, etc., 1966 Etching on wove paper Dated in the plate Plate VII from “El Entierro del Conde de Orgaz” (The Burial of the Count of Orgaz). A fine impression from the book edition of 263 on Romani wove paper. Aside from an edition of 30 on Japon paper, an edition of 2 on China paper applied to Romani wove paper, 6 trial proofs, as well as an edition of 12 on Japon paper outside of the book. There are also editions before steelfacing. Printed by La Sociedad Alianza de Artes Gráficas, Barcelona. Published by Gustavo Gili, Barcelona. Bloch 1472; Baer 1383; Cramer 146 14 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches Picasso wrote his autobiographical poem ”El Entierro del Conde de Orgaz” (The Burial of the Count of Orgaz) over a period of two years from 1957 to 1959, during a period of renewed interest in his Spanish heritage. The title is a reference to a painting of the same name by El Greco in the church of San Tomé, Toledo, an art- ist Picasso held in high esteem. The poem is written in Spanish in an unpunctuated style that draws upon the sights and sounds of Picasso’s Andalusian childhood. The illustrations include one engraving from 1939 and twelve etchings made between 1966 and 1967 of circus scenes and allegorical images infused with emotion and eroticism, all recalling the artist’s Spanish homeland and its influence on his work and life. In this etch- ing, faces look on as a nude woman is being held up by a nude man brandishing a phallic staff. The staff is equated symbolically to Zeus’s lightning bolts, and creates an image of violence, power and virility. 915399 $3,480

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) El Entierro del Conde de Orgaz: Scène de Cirque avec une Écuyère sur un char Mené par une Âne, 1967 Etching on Romani wove paper Dated in the plate Plate III from “El Entierro del Conde de Orgaz” (The Burial of the Count of Orgaz). A fine impression from the book edition of 263 on Romani wove paper. Aside from an edition of 30 on Japon paper, an edition of 2 on China paper applied to Romani wove paper, 6 trial proofs, as well as an edition of 12 on Japon paper out- side of the book. There are also editions before steelfacing. Printed by La Sociedad Alianza de Artes Gráfi- cas, Barcelona. Published by Gustavo Gili, Barcelona. Bloch 1468; Baer 1379; Cramer 146 14 1/4 x 18 1/4 inches Picasso wrote his autobiographical poem ”El Entierro del Conde de Orgaz” (The Burial of the Count of Or- gaz) over a period of two years from 1957 to 1959, during a period of renewed interest in his Spanish heri- tage. The title is a reference to a painting of the same name by El Greco in the church of San Tomé, Toledo, an artist Picasso held in high esteem. The poem is written in Spanish in an unpunctuated style that draws upon the sights and sounds of Picasso’s Andalusian childhood. The illustrations include one engraving from 1939 and twelve etchings made between 1966 and 1967 of circus scenes and allegorical images infused with emotion and eroticism, all recalling the artist’s Spanish homeland and its influence on his work and life. The present work, ”Scène de Cirque avec une Écuyère sur un char Mené par une Âne” (Circus Scene with a Squire on a Chariot led by a Donkey) is a fine impression from this edition. 915400 $3,480

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Fumeur. II, 1964 Color aquatint on Auvergne Richard de Bas paper Signed in crayon and dedicated lower right

A fine impression, with colors fresh and strong. One of approximately 15 rare artist’s proofs. Aside from the edition of fifty plus test proofs. Printed by Pennequin for Crommelynck, Paris. Published by Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris. Provenance: Édouard and Hélène Pignon, Nice (artist and art critic who were close friends of Picasso); Gift from the artist;

Guido Bosi, Bologna; Gifted by the above; By descent to the previous owner Bloch 1166; Baer 1166 B.b.2 22 x 16 inches 915172

In the summer of 1964, Picasso created ”Fumeurs” (Smokers), a series of thirteen aquatints of a man wear- ing a striped sailor’s shirt with a cigarette in his mouth, each conveying a different mood. They are executed in broad brushstrokes and printed in a vibrant palette, seen in our rare example. The images are playful, and project an image of cool masculinity at a time when smoking was still considered glamorous. The ”Fumeurs” have traditionally been understood to be idealized self-portraits of a kind: Picasso was a smoker himself and one of his favorite things to wear was the traditional striped shirt of the French Marines. Édouard Pignon (1905-1993), to whom Picasso dedicated and gifted this artwork, was one of France’s foremost painters, and a member of the “Twenty Painters of French Tradition.” Picasso and Pignon met in 1936, shortly before Picasso began his groundbreaking mural, “Guernica,” for the Spanish Pavilion at the 1937 World’s Fair. They later became great friends as well as French Communist Party members, along with Pignon’s wife Helene, and the couple regularly spent summer months with Picasso in the south of France.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Hommage à René Char, 1969 Color lithograph on Arches paper Signed in red crayon; signed and dated in the plate

A strong impression from the edition of 100 on Arches paper before the lettering, aside from the edition of 3,000. Printed by Henri Deschamps for the Mourlot Atelier, Paris. Created for an exhibition at the Musée Municipal d’Art Moderne, Céret, France. Czwiklitzer 291 27 7/8 x 20 3/8 inches

915410 $12,900 René Char (1907-1988) was a French poet and member of the French Resistance.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Affiche Pour l’Exhibition 1957, 1957 Color lithograph on Arches wove paper Stamp signed and annotated in pencil A rare proof impression without lettering, before the edition of 1,500. For the exhibition “Picasso Peintures 1955–1956,” held at Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris, in 1957. Printed by Mourlot, Paris. With the Marina Picasso inkstamp verso (L. 3698. Provenance: The artist; By descent to his granddaughter, Marina Picasso; Private Collection, UK Bloch 1275; Mourlot 299; Czwiklitzer 25 29 1/4 x 21 1/4 inches 915361 SOLD Many of the leading 20th century artists designed their own exhibition posters, often in the form of origina lithographs. These were printed by some of the great Parisian print ateliers, such as Atelier Mourlot, among others.

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Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Histoire de Sabartés et de sa voisine: , 1957

Aquatint on BFK Rives wove paper Stamp signed and annotated in pencil

From the unpublished series, “Histoire de Sabartés et de sa voisine: ” (Story of Sa- bartés and his Neighbor: ). Picasso expert Brigitte Baer records 16 impressions; there was no published edition of this subject. Printed by Frélaut, Paris. With the Marina Picasso inkstamp verso (L. 3698). Provenance: The artist; By descent to his granddaughter, Marina Picasso; Private Collection, UK Baer 965 13 x 16 1/2 inches Jaime Sabartés (1881-1968) was a Spanish artist, poet and writer. He and Picasso met in 1899, when both were 18 years old, and formed a close friendship, with Sabartés later becoming Picasso’s secretary. During their long friendship, Picasso executed various portraits of Sabartés in different media, many full of irony – an irony mixed with jokes and affection, which was the basis of their friendship. Some of these art- works can be found in the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow, the Museu Picasso, Barcelona, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, among others. 915355 $4,480

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Histoire de Sabartés et de sa voisine: Les Banderilles, 1957

Aquatint on BFK Rives wove paper Stamp signed and annotated in pencil

From the unpublished series, “Histoire de Sabartés et de sa voisine: Les Banderilles” (History of Sabartés and his Neighbor: Les Banderilles). Picasso expert Brigitte Baer records 16 impressions; there was no pub- lished edition of this subject. Printed by Frelaut, Paris. With the Marina Picasso inkstamp verso (L. 3698) Provenance: The artist; By descent to his granddaughter, Marina Picasso; Private Collection, UK Baer 968 12 7/8 x 16 5/8 inches

915356 $4,380

Pablo, Après PICASSO La Corrida, 1956 Color aquatint on Arches paper Signed and inscribed in pencil

A rare artist’s proof, aside from the edition of 200. Print- ed by Crommelynck, Paris, with the blind stamp lower left. The annotation ”E.A.” stands for ”épreuve d’artiste,” meaning artist’s proof. A very good, richly-inked impres- sion of this large aquatint with strong colors. 22 1/4 x 30 inches 915156 Many prominent 20th century artists produced ”after” prints, that is etchings, aquatints and lithographs produced after their well-known oil paintings, issuing works that were made by the same professional print- makers that they were working with to produce their ”original” editions. In some cases, the ”after” prints were created by well-known artists, like Jacques Villon, who also made prints after paintings by Manet, Cézanne, Van Gogh and Matisse. ”After” prints were also created under the auspices of artists’ publishers. Like his contemporaries--Chagall, Braque and Ma- tisse--Picasso assisted his printers closely throughout the entire process; he chose each image and which technique to use, directed the lithographer or engrav- er, and corrected and approved the proofs, authorizing his production of the work by hand signing the edition. These ”after” prints reproduce prominent, large color paintings from earlier in the artists’ careers, created before they had begun to utilize color printmaking techniques. Generally, these ”after” editions have been championed by print publishers too as a means of ex- tending the artists’ commercial output.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) La Danseuse, 1954 Color lithograph on paper Signed in the plate

, Frontispiece for Boris Kochno’s ‘Le Ballet’. Published by Arts du Monde / Hachette. Printed by Mourlot Frères Paris. Text in French. The volume also includes numerous colored illustrations and black & white photographs on the history of the ballet. Bloch 767; Mourlot 259; Cramer 68 12 1/4 x 8 3/4 inches 915393 SOLD Simple yet striking, this colorful lithograph masterfully conveys the energy and joy of the ballet. Picasso uses the simplicity of line and a limited palette of four colors to convey the lively yet graceful movement of the dancer. Boris Kochno (1904-1990) was a Russian-born writer and ballet librettist who collaborated with ballet impresario Serge Diaghilev (1872-1929) during the last years of the Ballets Russes. He was one of the most significant influences on post-World War II French ballet. In his later years, he authored the books Le Ballet (1954) and Diaghilev et les Ballets Russes (1970).

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) A Los Toros: Le Picador II, 1961 Color lithograph on wove paper Annotated in pencil lower left

A rare working proof aside from the signed and numbered edition of 50, and the regular book edition. Cre- ated for the illustrated book ”A Los Toros avec Picasso” by Jaime Sabartés. Dated in the plate. Printed by Mourlot, Paris. Published by André Sauret, Monte Carlo. Stamped verso, ‘Succ. Ateliers Mourlot’. Bloch 1017; Mourlot 350; Cramer 113 10 1/4 x 13 3/16 inches

915110 $9,800

This is one of Picasso’s most colorful lithographs, based on a crayon drawing he created just after he mar- ried Jacqueline Roque in Vallauris, France. He completed the drawing on April 21, 1961 and both dates are in the lithograph.

Picasso was a great animal lover and he surround- ed himself with pets such as dogs, goats, and birds (including an owl he tamed to sit on his finger). This translated in his art to distinctive renderings of an animals’ features and movements. Museum of Modern Art curator Deborah Wye imag- ines Picasso may have been interested in providing amusing images for the pleasure of his baby daugh- ter Maya (b. 1935) (A Picasso Portfolio: Prints from the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2010, p. 87). The thirty-two animals Picasso depicted in his plates remain among the highest level of achievement in the sugar-lift aquatint technique in the history of print- making. Perhaps equally important, ”there is great charm in these beasts: among them is a comical ostrich speeding by, a friendly monkey holding out a paw, a ram posing with great daintiness, and a cat that seems almost to purr” (Wye, p. 87). They have captivated and delighted everyone who sees them since they were published, possibly more so at the time of their release in 1942, as the world was at war and was in desperate need of light diversion.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Le Chat, 1942 Sugar-lift aquatint, drypoint etching and engraving on wove paper Titled lower center in plate From the series “Picasso. Eaux-fortes originales pour les textes de Buffon.” Martin Fabiani, éditeur, Paris, 1942. An excellent impression of the second state. Bloch 333; Baer 580 B.b.; Cramer 37 17 1/4 x 13 1/8 inches In 1931, French art dealer Ambroise Vollard suggest- ed that Picasso illustrate ”Histoire Naturelle, générale et particulière” by Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon (1707-1788), a French naturalist. The thirty-two etchings Picasso ultimately produced for the ”Histoire Naturelle” were primarily created in February of 1936, and the volume was published in 1942. 915121 $12,900

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Buste de Femme au Fichu, 1939 Aquatint and engraving on Montval laid paper

A rich, painterly impression of Dora Maar, Picasso’s lover and muse from 1935-1943. From the rare edition of 56, printed by Lacouriére in 1942, with Picasso watermark. The only other edition created aside from various proofs was an edition of 50. Published by Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris. Bloch 324; Baer 672 II B.b. 17 1/2 x 13 1/4 inches 913115 At this point in his career, Picasso was fluent with the various approaches available to him in printmaking, and he makes full use of them here. Sugarlift aquatint, engraving and burnishing is combined with drypoint sugarlift and scraper to achieve a wide range of subtle tonal changes, lending depth and interest to the image. Picasso was introduced into this technique by the printer Roger Lacourière, and cultivated it in his own masterly way.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Buste au fond étoilé, 1949 Lithograph on Arches paper Signed and annotated in red crayon

A rare and unique bon à tirer impression. Prior to the edition of 50 plus 7 artist’s proofs. Printed by Imprim- erie Mourlot, Paris. Published by Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler for Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris. Bon à tirer means ”good to pull.” This is the first perfect impression of the work and the one that will be used to judge all other impressions in the edition.

25 5/8 x 19 9/16 inches Bloch 594; Mourlot 163 915010

A beautiful and compelling portrait of Picasso’s lover and muse, Françoise Gilot (b. 1921), this work emphasiz- es her large eyes, straight nose, and face framed by a mass of hair. Evident also is the crosshatching tech- nique used in her dress, reminiscent of works by Henri Matisse, a friend and professional rival of Picasso’s. A fresh impression, full of superb contrast, and the finest impression Galerie Michael has seen of this graphic. Fernand Mourlot was an important collaborator in Picasso’s post-war work. His atelier had a long history of printmaking, beginning in the mid-1850s. It was Fernand who would move the atelier towards fine art, work- ing with the most important artists in Paris, from Manet to Miró, and was also pivotal in fostering the develop- ment of the editioned print. This, in turn, led to a greater emphasis on the artistic focus and value of a print. Mourlot referred to this image as ”au point de vue métier une réussite remarquable (a high quality piece with remarkable success).” This was probably in reference to the new brush technique Picasso used, where lavis and gouache on lithograph paper were blotted onto the stone. Picasso, in typical fashion, concentrated a majority of work into an intense period of regular collaboration, in the mid-to-late 1940s. He began working with Mourlot in November of 1945, with a portrait of Françoise Gilot as the first of over 300 lithographs he would create with the atelier. Picasso would spend entire days in the studio, obsessively reworking his images. His approach was unusual for the medium. He treated the stone much as he had his earlier engraving plates and linoleum blocks, in that he preferred to rework a single stone, resulting in remarkable patterns, texture and depth in a finalized artwork.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Françoise sur fond gris, 1950 Lithograph with wash and lithographic crayon on Ingres Canson blue-grey paper set on Arches wove paper Signed and numbered in pencil A superb, richly-inked impression of this large, important lithograph of Françoise Gilot, Picasso’s muse and mistress. From the edition of 50, aside from at least 5 artist’s proofs. Second state. Re-working of zinc with lithographic crayon, printed on Ingres Canson sized blue-grey paper and set on Arches wove paper. Printed by Mourlot, Paris. “Françoise sur fond gris” is one of Picasso’s most poignant and sentimental portraits of Françoise Gilot. He captures her beauty inside and out, while completely mastering the lithography medium. Picasso’s ability to create density of lines, shading and depth in this medium is remarkable, and a true example of his artistic skill. In this work, the exceptionally graceful Gilot models for the artist in an intimate and serene moment. An exquisite work of art for a Picasso, or Gilot, art connoisseur. At the age of 61, Picasso first saw the 21 year old Françoise Gilot in a restaurant in the spring of 1943. In 1946, Gilot and Picasso began a decade-long relationship. Their circle included poets, philosophers, writ- ers, and many of the legends of the art world, such as Braque, Chagall, Cocteau and Matisse. In addition to being Picasso’s model and muse, Gilot was his intellectual equal. He wanted her to stay up late at night with him, talking and arguing about his work. Her independence, directness, and insights fascinated and an- noyed him, and nourishing his insatiable appetite for life. By late 1953, the relationship with Picasso had run its course and Gilot left the home she shared with him in Vallauris, returning to Paris with their children. Picasso’s collaborative efforts with the Mourlot printing atelier during this period are notable as well, as they were able to produce strong and poignant results. Roland Penrose recounts the first lithograph Picas- so conceived upon his return was the portrait of a girl in full face, ”The regular olive-shaped outline of the head, and the straight nose, have classical proportion, and the well-formed mouth set in the cup of a firm but graceful chin is the clue to an independent character. The model was Françoise Gilot.” (Picasso: His Life and Work, 1958). Bloch 681; Mourlot 195 29 3/4 x 22 1/2 inches 914460

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Jacqueline de profil (Buste de femme au corsage blanc), 1958 Lithograph on Arches wove paper Dated in the plate An extremely rare proof of the third state, originally reserved for the artist.

In December 1957, Picasso composed the first state of “Buste de femme au corsage blanc” (Bust of a wom- an in a white bodice) on a zinc plate, resulting in 50 signed and numbered copies (bloch 848). In March 1958, the artist reworked the same zinc plate but did not successfully print this version. In December 1958, he revisited the same zinc plate again, reworking it, and renaming it “Jacqueline de profil,” of which ours is an exceptional example. Only a few proofs of these efforts exist, as they were originally reserved for the artist. Published by Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris.

Bloch 848; Mourlot 311 30 1/16 x 22 1/8 inches 914939

A strong example of Picasso’s proficiency of the graphic medium, showcasing the regal beauty of his wife and muse, Jacqueline Roque. With rich tones and contrasts, Jacqueline is strikingly beautiful as she gazes forward with a tranquil yet adoring expression on her face. She is shown in profile, a classic Mediterranean beauty evoking feelings of serenity and luminosity that serve to symbolize his great love for her. In Picasso’s later years, Jacqueline was the most important and frequently portrayed figure in Picasso’s work, always dignified and beautiful, with elegant and fluid lines. Picasso was able to maintain a brilliant bal- ance between the medium and subject, capturing volume, texture and emotion. In this medium, he is able to masterfully create a ”painterly print,” portraying color with values in tones and gradations of black and white. While extremely difficult for most artists to execute, for Picasso it is child’s play.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) La Femme à la Fenêtre, 1952 Aquatint on Arches wove paper

A very fine impression, one of six recorded impressions before steel-facing. Aside from the numbered edi- tion of 50 after steel-facing. Printed by Lacourière, Paris. Published by Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris. With full margins. Inscribed “Lacourière” in the plate (shown in reverse). Provenance: Marina Picasso Collection, with her stamp verso; Frederick Mulder, London; Private Collection, CA Exhibition History: Williamstown, Massachusetts, The Clark Art Institute, Picasso: Encounters, 2017 Bloch 695; Baer 891/II/A 35 1/2 x 25 inches 700173 This monumental portrait of Françoise Gilot is considered one of the most compelling and powerful in Pi- casso’s graphic oeuvre. Gilot, praised by the photographer Brassai for her ‘freshness and restless vitality’ met Picasso in 1943 and soon became the subject of many of his best prints of the period: Torse de Femme (L’Egyptienne), Vénus et l’Amour, d’après Cranach, and the series of lithographs titled La Femme au fauteuil. For Picasso printmaking was a physical process and the struggle with materials an integral part of the creative journey. His vigorous, experimental approach led him to many radical departures from traditional printmaking, in which the expressive potential of the plate or stone was stretched to its limit. In Femme à la Fenêtre, Picasso used sugar-lift aquatint, a technique introduced to him by the master intaglio printer Roger Lacourière in the 1930’s. Using ink mixed with sugar and soap, the image is brushed onto the plate, allowed to dry, then covered with varnish. The plate is then immersed in water. As the sugar swells it lifts the varnish, leaving the plate exposed where it had previously been covered by the brush drawing, to be aquatinted and bitten in the normal manner. This technique allows for soft painterly effects, creating washes of dappled tone. Gilot’s elegant and prominent features are exaggerated and stylized into broad, inky sweeps, dramati- cally contrasting with the pitted plate tone of the background. The effect is strikingly beautiful. There is an overwhelmingly poignant, elegant tone to this composition, created at a time when their relation- ship was falling apart. Gilot’s plaintive attitude, gazing through a window, yearning for freedom, was to be amongst Picasso’s last portraits of her before their relationship foundered in 1953.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Portrait de femme à la fraise et au chapeau, 1962 Linoleum cut printed in colors on Arches wove paper Signed and numbered in pencil

A remarkable impression from the edition of 50, signed and numbered, plus twenty artist’s proofs. With full margins. Printed by Imprimerie Arnéra, Vallauris. Published by Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris. A superb impres- sion of this important print with fresh colors. Bloch 1145; Baer 1323 B.b. 22 3/8 x 17 5/16 inches 915013 Among the more than 150 color linoleum cuts that Picasso produced during the 1950s and 1960s, none stand out for their boldness of execution and sheer artistry more than his colorful, semi-abstract portraits of his second wife, Jacqueline Roque (1927-1986). Picasso’s entry to the medium of color linoleum cut coin- cided with his introduction to Jacqueline in the early 1950s. He had tried his hand at a few monochromatic linoleum cuts in the 1930s but never pursued the medium any further until the mid-1950s. Abandoned by her father, Jacqueline was 18 years old when her mother died of a stroke. She settled in southern France in the early 1950s and took a job at the Madoura Pottery workshop in Vallauris. Picasso, then 72, met Jacqueline, 27, in 1953 while he was beginning what would become a creative outburst of limit- ed edition pottery at the same Madoura Pottery workshop. They were married in 1961, following the death of Picasso’s first wife, Olga. To remedy the technical and tedious problems of the traditional linoleum cut process, Picasso and his print- er Hidalgo Arnéra came up with an extraordinary solution: rather than use separate blocks for each color, he printed the whole image from just one block using the ”reduction” method. The block was printed in the lightest color, then cut further and printed successively from the lighter to the darker colors. While making the task of registration much simpler, it required a tremendous power of imagination to foresee how each change in the block would affect the composition as a whole. It was precisely the kind of artistic experiment which Picasso enjoyed - a creative liberation, and creation by destruction. This work, in which Picasso utilized the reduction method, is a masterful, painterly composition, with layer upon layer of rich colors. Although linoleum cuts form a relatively small part of Picasso’s oeuvre as a print- maker, he created some of his most outstanding compositions in this technique, in this short burst of activity between 1958 and 1963. In ”Portrait de femme à la fraise et au chapeau” (Portrait of a Woman with a Strawberry and a Hat), Picasso exaggerates Jacqueline’s dark eyes, arching eyebrows and high cheekbones, showcasing her almost turned in profile. These characteristics would become steadfast in his late portraiture, predominately focused on Jacqueline, showcasing this love and affection for her, as well as her unwavering, steadfast devotion to him.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Jacqueline au Chapeau à Fleurs. II, 1962 Linoleum cut printed in colors on Arches wove paper

A rare proof of this captivating impression, in which the colors are layered in the following order: beige, light brown, brown, red, blue, black, and finally the brown border. From the Galerie Louise Leiris edition, published in 1963, aside from the signed and numbered edition of 50. Printed by Arnéra, Vallauris. Another example can be found at the Musée Picasso, Barcelona, dedicated to Jaime Sabartés (1881-1968), an artist, poet and writer who was close friends with Picasso. Bloch 1149; Baer 1304 B.b. 24 3/4 x 17 1/2 inches 700174 Among the more than 150 color linoleum cuts that Picasso produced during the 1950s and 1960s, none stand out for their boldness of execution and sheer artistry more than his colorful, semi-abstract portraits of his second wife, Jacqueline Roque (1927-1986). Picasso’s entry to the medium of color linoleum cut coin- cided with his introduction to Jacqueline in the early 1950s. He had tried his hand at a few monochromatic linoleum cuts in the 1930s but never pursued the medium any further until the mid-1950s. Abandoned by her father, Jacqueline was 18 years old when her mother died of a stroke. She settled in southern France in the early 1950s and took a job at the Madoura Pottery workshop in Vallauris. Picasso, then 72, met Jacqueline, 27, in 1953 while he was beginning what would become a creative outburst of limit- ed edition pottery at the same Madoura Pottery workshop. They were married in 1961. To remedy the techni- cal and tedious problems of the traditional linoleum cut process, Picasso devised an extraordinary solution: rather than use separate blocks for each color, he printed the whole image from just one block in the so- called ”reduction” method. The block was printed in the lightest color, then cut further and printed succes- sively from the lighter to the darker colors. While making the task of registration much simpler, it required a tremendous power of imagination to foresee how each change in the block would affect the composition as a whole, because there was no going back once the block was reduced in printable area with each successive color. It was precisely the kind of artistic experiment which Picasso enjoyed - a creative liberation. Ultimate- ly, it was an artistic experiment which Picasso enjoyed; he embraced the challenge wholeheartedly and with remarkable results. This work, in which Picasso utilized the reduction method, is a masterful, painterly composition, with layer upon layer of rich colors. Although linoleum cuts form a relatively small part of Picasso’s oeuvre as a print- maker, he created some of his most outstanding compositions in this technique, in this short burst of activity between 1958 and 1963. In these color linoleum cut portraits of Jacqueline, Picasso exaggerates her dark eyes, arching eyebrows and high cheekbones. These characteristics would become steadfast in his late portraiture, predominately focused on Jacqueline, showcasing this love and affection for her.

Pablo PICASSO (1881-1973) Danaé, 1962 Linoleum cut printed in colors on Arches wove paper Dated twice in the plate A rare color test proof of the fourth and final state, before the edition of 50 on Arches paper. In this state, the colors are layered in the following order: black, creamy white, yellow, red, and finally blue. Printed by Imprimerie Arnéra, Vallauris. Published by Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris. Bloch 1084; Baer 1286 IV.B. 18 x 25 1/2 inches 915005 “The history of Danaé is one of the best known Greek myths: a princess locked up in a tower with whom Zeus fell passionately in love. She was sequestered in a tower because an oracle had told her father, Acrisios, that his daughter’s son would kill him, which eventually happened, as oracles were always proved right. Zeus, who used to change shape to seduce the objects of his desire, this time descended in the form of a golden rain. The result of this bizarre union was the hero Perseus, the future slayer of the Medusa. The erotic and psychological possibilities of this subject had stimulated many of the greatest painters from the Renaissance onwards: in exchange for their favours, women want money, money, and more money. The com- position of the sleeping Danaé is built on a black structure which is a type of Spanish ”vargueño” - a cabinet placed on a trestle table. Traditionally this piece of furniture was used to lock up gold, money, jewels and important papers. Danaé was locked up in a tower just as the cabinet was locked too. Zeus found the key.” In this evolution of states, the background is black; the first state is printed in creamy white, giving a bluish gray tone while the grooves remain black... The next state, printed in yellow, alludes to the golden rain, as, like the gold coins, Danaé’s body is golden whereas her bed remains gray. In the third state, the background wall and half of the body take a violet red color (passion); the other half of the body and the rain of gold coins remain yellow. Then in the fourth state, the wall turns into a blue sky...” -Brigitte Baer, Pablo Picasso - Prints in Progress: Rare States and Working Proofs from the Atelier, Galerie Michael, 1999 The myth of Danaé has inspired artists throughout the ages, including Caravaggio, Rembrandt and Klimt. She is used as the quintessential symbol of divine love and tran- scendence. Utilizing rich, primary colors, Picasso beauti- fully captures the essence of the great myth, while adding his personal technique and flourish to the composition. Our example is an especially rare test proof, and can usually only be found in museum collections.

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