July 29 eEdition

Sentinel Greenwich If you can do something good, something meaningful, then remove all hesitation and do it!

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Our Neighborhoods DOWNTOWN S Sunday, July 31, 1 pm – 4 pm. Harry Potter Drop In Crafts held at Greenwich Library rear of Children’s Room (101 W. Putnam Ave.) Children age 3 and up can visit our drop- in craft table to make a craft from 1-4pm in the Children’s Room. We are celebrating Harry Potter’s Birthday and the release of book #8! S Sunday, July 31, 2 pm – 3 pm. Harry Potter Trivia Contest held at Greenwich Library (101 W. Putnam Ave.) Who knows the most about Harry Potter? Let’s celebrate Harry Potter’s birthday, the release of book #8, and all things Hogwarts with a Trivia Contest presented by Magician/Wizard Christopher Hurlbert. Activities and trivia begin at 2pm. Up to 8 players can play at a time during a round, using buzzers and props to compete for small prizes. For more information contact the Children’s Desk at 203-622-7940. S Monday, August 1, 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm. Knee Replacement Education held at Greenwich Hospital (5 Perryridge Rd.) Prepare yourself and your family or friends for your upcoming k nee repl acement su rger y at Greenwich Hospital. Get answers to any questions you may have either before or after your surgery, post-operative care and discharge planning. S Tuesday, August 2, 7 pm – 9 pm. Special Meeting of Greenwich Board of Education held at Havemeyer Building (290 Greenwich Ave.) The purpose of this special meeting is to discuss and possibly act upon the New Lebanon Building Committee recommendation from July 20, discuss interim superintendent goals, discuss and possibly act upon the selection of a firm for the superintendent search and to take action on minutes from previous BOE meetings. OLD GREENWICH S Saturday, July 30, 1 pm – 5 pm. Sandblast 2015/Sand Sculpture Festival held at Tod’s Point. The popular Sandblast! Sand Sculpture Festival will be held once again this summer at Greenwich Point Beach. For rain date info, call 203-861-6100. Sandblast is intended purely for the fun of creativity, and thanks to Meli-Melo Juice Bar of Greenwich, all participants are winners. Don’t forget your sun block, shovels and sculpting tools! S Saturday, July 30, 7 pm – 9 pm. Silver Shield Community Concer t : Let ’s Hang On – Frankie Valli Tribute Band held at Roger Sherman Baldwin Park. S Sunday, July 31, 1 pm – 3 pm. Science Sunday: Electricity held at Bruce Museum (1 Museum Dr.) A drop-in program designed for children ages 4 and up and their families. Participants will explore simple science concepts and subjects while partaking in fun, kid-friendly experiments, projects and crafts inspired by the Museum’s collections and exhibitions. Free with Museum admission and no advance registration required. S Sunday, July 31, 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm. Science on the Silver Screen: ‘The Martian’ held at Bruce Museum (1 MuseumDr.) Join us for an afternoon at the movies with the experts. Screening will be followed by Q&A session with a scientist to explain what was right, what was wrong, and what was just confusing. Free with Museum admission. RSVP to Kate at kdzikiewicz@ brucemuseum.org. S Wednesday, August 3, 7:15 pm – 8:45 pm. Wednesday Night Concert Series: Cynthia Sayer Jazz held at Roger Sherman B a l dw i n Pa r k . P l e a s e no pets and no grills. Raindate: Thursday, August 4. Weather postponement/cancellation information after 4pm available at 203-861-6100.

Family Centers Celebrates New Health Care Clinic On a near-perfect Saturday, the Wiffle Ball community from all over Greenwich and the surrounding areas came together to the Greenwich Polo Club for the annual Greenwich Wiffle Ball Tournament and tremendous fun was had by all. This year the tourney, which started bright and early in the morning and lasted well into the afternoon, raised money for Kids in Crisis. To read more about the event, check out our Doing Greater Good section. (John Ferris Robben photo) F amily Centers and Wilbur Peck Court celebrated the opening of the new Family Centers Health Care Clinic, which is embedded into the public housing community, with a ribbon cutting ceremony Monday morning. By Evan Triantafilidis Sentinel Reporter

Elected officials including U.S. Rep. Jim Himes, Selectman John Toner, and state Reps. Fred Camillo and Mike Bocchino were on hand for the opening of the easily accessible health clinic. “We knew that folks in Greenwich, who were primarily living in public housing, who were having to go to either Stamford or Port Chester for medical care, or they would end up at the emergency room of Greenwich Hospital for just routine care,” said Dennis Torres, Family Centers’ director of Health Care Programs. “We wanted to expand the access, right here on-site, where there is very little excuse for missing an appointment.” Staffed by nurse practitioners, dentists and other professionals, the Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) will provide health service to children and adults living in Greenwich Public Housing communities and in surrounding neighborhoods.

The ribbon is cut at new Family Centers Health Care clinic, located at Wilbur Peck Court. (Evan Triantafilidis photo) Karl’s Story Independence Threatened by Budget Cuts K arl Arezzini wants what anyone would want. He wants to play his cello, as in Hartford have put that independence in peril. Yet there’s hope, and Karl has a team of people lining up to help, beginning with his parents. They’re both teachers in Greenwich—Lynn for 34 years and David for 35, though not all of them here. By Rob Adams Sentinel Reporter

See CLINIC on Page 11

he has done since he was five. He wants to sing, and does so in a brilliant voice that has helped give him recognition in a film shown at the Tribeca Film Festival. He also wants freedom. That comes with a price. Karl, the son of Lynn and David Arezzini of Greenwich, is 25 and has autism. He currently lives at Chapel Haven in New Haven. Chapel Haven’s motto, according to its website, is “A unique integration of social communication and independent living.” However, budget cuts

It wouldn’t be unfair to call Lynn and David advocates, as they have actively spoken out in support not only of Karl, but of all who deal with intellectual or developmental disabilities (I/DD). To that end, Lynn is a member of CT DDS Families First, a non-profit group that supports all Connecticut citizens with I/ DD. Still, Karl’s parents glow about their son, as well as about their daughter, Rose.

See AREZZINI on Page 11

Karl Arezzini playing the cello during a recent event. (contributed photo)

Audubon, State Name New Important Bird Areas By Anne W. Semmes Sentinel Columnist

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP). The new areas are forest landscapes in the main, with the exception of the “Mouth of the Connecticut River,” which includes Old Lyme and its Great Island historic population of ospreys along with the Roger Tory PetersonWildlife Management Area; and Old Saybrook, with the Ragged Rock CreekWildlife Management Area.

“We have long recognized t he value of IBA’s as a tool for conservation of impe r i led bi rd spe c i e s a c ro s s Connecticut,” said DEEP Commissioner Robert Klee at the news sharing event last week at the Audubon Miles Sanctuary in Sharon. “Establishing these five sites with Audubon Connecticut,” he said, “and building public recognition of their value will help us preserve the habitats these

sites provide and the bird species that depend on them.” The Audubon Mi les Sanc tua r y included with the Housatonic State Forest Block marks one of the five IBA’s. The other three are the Macedonia Forest Block in the northwest corner of the state, the mid-state Meshomasic Forest Block,

B i rd lovers of Greenwich and statewide will be heartened by the news from Audubon Connecticut of five new Important Bird Areas, or IBA’s, established across the state, thanks to a partnership of Audubon with the

See IBA on Page 4

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