Marc Chagall—2020

COVER: CHAGALL, Marc, 1887-1985 Le Cirque, 1967

224 North Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, California, 90210 • Monday-Saturday 10-6 • Sunday 11-5 310.273.3377 • www.galeriemichael.com • art@galeriemichael.com

As we move together in re-opening the world’s economy, we seek common ground—things that we can readily agree on. Things that we can share with each other. Things that draw us—and then bind us—together. Galerie Michael, like every other organization in the world, is working feverishly to do our part. We bring joy, appreciation and culture into people’s homes and lives around the world, because our art bridges national borders, political divides, generation gaps and everything else that might separate us from one another. We have a unique ability to serve multitudes of peo- ple in distant and diverse places. In these troubling times, we sought out happiness, and quickly settled on 20th century Modern Master, Marc Chagall, to be our next exhibition (albeit virtual). Here was an artist who had the rare ability to start each morning fresh—as if each day was the first. He saw each flower as the most brilliant, each fruit as the sweetest, and each woman as the most beautiful. What better person could there be to give us a positive perspective? What’s more is that some of these works were part of a collection that had not been seen for sixty years—and never by the public. They were secreted away in the secure cabinets of the descen- dants of Chagall’s printmaker, Charles Sorlier. These were works that not only captured the amaz- ing colors that are quintessentially Chagall, but were hand-colored by the master himself. These were the very proofs that then gave birth to the graphic masterworks that grace the walls of muse- ums, galleries, and private collections the world over. Please take a few moments to explore our interactive digital catalog. We are certain that your day will be brighter as a result! A mong the most eminent of the 20th century modern artists, Marc Chagall stands out as a romantic genius. Even Pablo Picasso, who had little regard for Chagall’s capricious nature, once commented after the death of Henri Matisse, “There is only one great colorist left and it is Marc Chagall.” Though Marc Chagall is classified with the School of Paris more than any other great modernist, he never joined a movement, nor can he be ascribed to any particular “ism”. Chagall stands out as one of the most original artists of his age. Overall, Chagall’s gemlike primary and secondary colors, combined with a natural tenderness, convey a fairytale or fable-like quality. Using a rich repertory of images often remembered from village life in his native Russia, he was able to construct a mythological world of dreamlike unreality. The pictorial symbols he created both enchant and captivate the viewer’s imagination, while completely avoiding anecdote. His heartfelt recollections of village life, presented in unnatural juxtapositions and magical color, imbue the works with an air of yearning, nostalgia and childlike wonderment. Chagall was a romantic, and his flying figures will forever embody his ideals about love. No artist is as famous for color lithography as Marc Chagall—an art form he elevated to the highest level of aesthetic achievement. Chagall had experimented with printmaking techniques when he was a young artist, creating woodcuts and etchings, but at that time he did not yet have the necessary knowledge and skill to master the technical printing process himself. In 1950, at age 63, Chagall became fascinated with lithography and it opened up a completely new era in his printmaking activities. Working in tandem with the great atelier of Paris, the Mourlot Studio, and master printer Charles Sorlier, Chagall created graphics that have become as prized by connois- seurs and museums as his paintings.

Museum Quality

Galerie Michael prides itself on discovering, then acquiring works that could grace the walls of museums anywhere in the world. In fact, some have already been proudly exhibited in museums. Some will do so again. Yet in serving our clientele, we are overjoyed when museum-quality works instead grace the walls of those clients’ private residences and places of business or commerce. These are works that will not only thrill the new owners, but their guests, colleagues, and family—for generations. Our Marc Chagall collection ranges from oils and gouaches on canvas, to gouache, tempera and colored pencil on Masonite, to mixed media. Many are hand-painted by the master himself. Each is both wonderful and rare. Many capture Chagall’s central core—love. Many comprise essential elements of Chagall’s fascination with the 3rd century story of Daphnis and Chloé. These are works that are described as being superb, vibrant, and exceptional. They are worthy of any museum-quality collection.

224 North Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, California, 90210 • Monday-Saturday 10-6 • Sunday 11-5 310.273.3377 • www.galeriemichael.com • art@galeriemichael.com

ONE OF A KIND

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Couple au Cirque, circa 1980 Oil and gouache on canvas Signed lower right; signed verso Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity from Comité Marc Chagall 39 1/2 x 31 7/8 in.(100.3 x 81 cm) Framed dimensions: 49 1/2 x 41 5/8 in. 404849 Price on Request

Couple au Cirque (c. 1980) by master artist Marc Chagall is anexceptionally rare, original oil paintingof museum quality. Today, most of Chagall’s original large-scale artworks are held in museum collections. In consideration of this, Galerie Michael’s acquisi- tion of Couple au Cirque is of profound importance. Marc Chagall (1887-1985) was born in Vitebsk, a pro- vincial Russian city linked by rail to St. Petersburg. Due to the accessibility of Vitebsk, troupes of touring performers, acrobats and equestrians would frequently visit Chagall’s hometown, and later, he also enjoyed the Cirque d’Hiver, the long-running “Winter Circus” located in Paris. Couple au Cirque (1980) which translates to “Couple at the Circus,” is a delightful recollection of Chagall’s memories from the circus and includes familiar images and motifs that frequently recur in his vast oeuvre. The composition of Couple au Cirque is in mixed per- spective and features a variety of whimsical figures performing in a circus. A female acrobat, placed on the top left of the composition, spreads her arms as she holds the ropes that carry her through the dramat- ic blue night. Under her, a shirtless figure appears to fly through the sky with a vase of lovely flowers in his hand. The flying figure may represent Chagall who frequently inserts himself into his artwork— often several times over. On the ground level of the circus there are a myriad of players with rings and in- struments. Despite the commotion ensuing in the air above them, each focuses intently on their own act.

Most notable is the image of a man and woman perched on a white steed towards the top right of the composition. The couple rides through the night sky in a soft embrace, paying no notice to the scene below them. They are shut off from the rest of the world and lock eyes as if they wish to gaze only at each other for the rest of eternity. The woman and man are likely representative of Chagall and his be- loved wife, Bella. Chagall features Bella in much of his work, and Couple au Cirque displays the intensi- ty of their love for each other, so in love that they are completely unaware of the happenings around them. Molly Dubin, the curator of the Jewish Museum of Milwaukee’s “La Cirque,” an exhibit inspired by Chagall’s work on the circus, says of Chagall: “It was always about his world, his memories and his own personal stories.” Couple au Cirque is a magnificent example of Chagall’s intimate connection to the subject(s) in which he depicts. Couple au Cirque speaks to Chagall’s enduring ap- peal as a visual storyteller with unapologetic roots in the pre-World War I Russian-Jewish community. Aside from the image of Chagall and Bella, the circus players that Chagall depicts signify the sudden invasion of wonderment into the flow of everyday life. Chagall’s allegorical connection with his own art allowed him to be not only a painter, but also a magician, actor and clown. A magnificent piece from Chagall’s famed circus collection, Couple au Cirque is a remarkably significant addition to a pri- vate, museum quality collection.

ONE OF A KIND

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) L’Homme au Samovar, 1922-23

Gouache on a lithographic base on wove paper Signed and inscribed “epreuve rehaussée” in pencil One of only two hand-colored impressions of this a rare and important work. With full margins. Aside from the signed and numbered edition of 35, plus an additional artist’s proof. “Epreuve rehaussée” translates to“enhanced proof”. Mourlot 4 16 1/8 x 24 1/2 in. 915699 Price on Request

A unique and incredibly rare lithograph, extensive- ly hand-colored by the artist, and one of only two in existence. Chagall’s official catalogue raisonné, “The Lithographs of Chagall” records only two hand-colored copies of this lithograph, and this exam- ple is so heavily-worked that it is more a painting than a print. These extremely scarce hand-colored proofs were, for the most part, retained by the artist, and were very occasionally gifted to close friends, stored for the majority of their existence in folios, with their coloration as bright and as fresh as the day they were created. The samovar is a metal urn traditionally used to boil water for tea in Russia. A symbol of family and friendship, when people gather around the samovar to enjoy tea, the imagery projects a sense of unity and warmth, and the richness of Russian heritage. Chagall left Russia in 1922 for Berlin, and eventually went to Paris to embark upon his collaboration with

printmaker Fernand Mourlot on major commissions from Ambroise Vollard. Yet his childhood and early career in Russia continued to be source of inspira- tion. The sense of nostalgia manifests itself through icons such as the samovar, a rustic village house, or cows in mid-air. Chagall possessed the impressive ability to lift his personal experience into recognizable elements of expression. Chagall relished in the creative environ- ment of the atelier; he approached the process with experimental rigor and spontaneity. The present work demonstrates a unique intersection of painting and printmaking. The bold lithographic background pro- vides a striking outline of which the vibrant gouache is imbued with life. The added strokes around the eyes and forehead animate the man with a sense of wakefulness and spirit.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: Daphnis and Lycenion, 1961 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist Annotated lower left in pencil A unique and vibrant mixed media bon à tirer impression, hand-painted by the artist on a lithographic touch plate. Annotated and signed by Charles Sorlier verso, before the signed and numbered edition. From the folio of 42 lithographs for ‘Daphnis and Chloé’ by Longus. Printed by Charles Sorlier at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris. Published by Tériade, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 336; Cramer no. 46 22 1/8 x 15 1/8 in. Framed dimensions: 41 x 33 1/4 in. 914781 $178,000 A unique bon à tirer impression, with extensive hand coloring by the artist. Bon à tirer means “good to pull.” This is the first perfect impression of the work that will set the standard for all future works in the edition. “Daphnis,’ she said, ‘you are in love with Chloé. The Nymphs told me so last night in a dream. They described how you burst into tears yesterday, and ordered me to come to your rescue by teaching you how to make love. And making love doesn’t just mean kissing and embracing and doing what the rams and he-goats do. It means a form of intercourse quite different from theirs and far sweeter—for the pleasure lasts longer. So if you want to stop being miserable and experience the delights that you’ve been looking for, come, put your delightful self into my hands and become my pupil—and I, to please the Nymphs, will teach you what you need to know.” —Longus, c. 3rd century AD

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: Death of Dorcon, 1961 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist Initialed in pencil by the artist; annotated by Sorlier in pencil An unique and vibrant mixed media bon à tirer impression of the second state, hand-painted by the artist on a lithographic touch plate. Annotated ‘Épreuve d’essai retouchée par Chagall avant le bon à tirer’ by Sorlier lower left. Annotated and signed by Charles Sorlier From the folio of 42 lithographs for ‘Daphnis and Chloé’ by Longus. Printed by Charles Sorlier at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris. Published by Tériade, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 320; Cramer no. 46 22 3/16 x 30 1/16 in. Framed dimensions: 43 1/2 x 50 3/4 in. 914778 $298,000 verso, before the signed and numbered edition.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: Echo, 1961 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist Initialed by the artist and annotated in pencil by Sorlier. A unique, exceptionally vibrant proof, hand-painted by the artist on a lithographic touch plate. Annotated “Épreuve e’Essai retouchée par Chagall avant le bon à tirer” by Charles Sorlier in pencil, lower left. Annotated and signed by Charles Sorlier verso, before the signed and numbered edition. From the folio of 42 lithographs for “Daphnis and Chloé” by Longus. Printed by Charles Sorlier at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris. Published by Tériade, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 340; Cramer no. 46 22 1/4 x 30 in. Framed dimensions: 43 1/2 x 50 1/2 in. 914783 $328,000

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: Lamon’s and Dryas’s Dreams, 1 961 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist Initialed by the artist and annotated in pencil

A unique, vibrant mixed media bon à tirer impression, hand-painted by the artist on a lithographic touch plate. Annotated lower left “Épreuve du bon à tirer retouchée par Chagall.” Annotated and signed by Charles Sorlier verso, before the signed and numbered edition. From the folio of 42 lithographs for ‘Daphnis and Chloé’ by Longus. Printed by Charles Sorlier at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris. Published by Tériade, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 311; Cramer no. 46 22 1/4 x 14 15/16 in. Framed dimensions: 41 x 33 1/2 in. 914776 $180,000 They dreamt that the Nymphs - the ones in the cave with the spring in it, where Dryas had found the baby —were handing Daphnis and Chloe over to a very autocratic and very beautiful small boy who had wings growing out of his shoulders and carried tiny arrows and a tiny bow. This boy hit both of them with a single arrow, and gave orders that Daphnis should in future be a goatherd, and Chloe a shepherdess . . . . —Longus, c. 3rd century AD

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: Megacles recogniz- es his daughter during the feast, 1961 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist Initialed by the artist and annotated in pencil by Sorlier. A unique, exceptionally vibrant mixed media bon à tirer impression, hand- painted by the artist on a lithographic touch plate. Annotated “Épreuve du bon à tirer re- touchée par Chagall” by Charles Sorli- er, lower left. Annotated and signed by Charles Sorlier verso, before the signed and numbered edition. From the folio of 42 lithographs for “Daphnis and Chloé” by Longus. Printed by Charles Sorlier at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris. Published by Tériade, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 347; Cramer no. 46 21 1/8 x 30 1/16 in. Framed dimensions: 43 1/2 x 50 1/2 in. 914786 $348,000

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: The Trampled Flowers, 1961 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist Initialed by the artist and annotated in pencil

A unique, exceptionally vibrant mixed media bon à tirer impression, hand-painted by the artist on a litho- graphic touch plate. Annotated “Épreuve retouchée par Chagall” by Charles Sorlier in pencil, lower left. Annotated and signed by Charles Sorlier verso, before the signed and numbered edition. From the folio of 42 lithographs for “Daphnis and Chloé” by Longus. Printed by Charles Sorlier at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris. Published by Tériade, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 342; Cramer no. 46 21 1/8 x 14 7/8 in. Framed dimensions: 41 1/4 x 33 1/2 in 914784 $198,000 If he set to work to fell the trees he would be seen and heard, so he thought that it would be better for him to make havoc among the flowers, which could be done easily at night; and passing in one night by the little door in the wall, he tore and trampled them underfoot just like a wild boar would, and then withdrew, nobody having seen him. When Lamon the next day, on going into the garden, as was his custom, to water his flowers, saw the place laid waste as if by an enemy in open warfare or a robber, he tore his jacket, crying: O Gods! So loudly that Myrtale, leaving her work, ran to him, and Daphnis, leaving his goats to themselves, returned to the house; and seeing the great damage done, they cried aloud and wept; and though vain indeed it was to grieve for the flowers, they dreaded their lord’s anger. It was not wonderful that these people should weep; even a stranger, who would never see the garden again, would have been moved by the sight of flower-beds and borders dug up and all the flowers thrown along the walks. Here and there a bloom had so far escaped outrage that it still shone as it lay, fair and resplendent, and these were still beset by the bees, murmuring continually like mourners. And Lamon, with gestures of despair, spoke these words: Ah! My roseries are broken down and torn, my violet-beds are trodden into the ground, my narcissi and hyacinths are torn up. A bad and wicked man it must be who has served me in this wise. The spring-time will return, but these will not flower again. The summer will come and the garden be without a bloom. The autumn is nigh and there are not enough flowers to tie into a posy. Thou, Bacchus, hadst thou no pity for these poor flowers that have been, in thy presence, before thine eyes, ruined? —Longus, c. 3rd century AD

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: The Wolf Pit, 1961 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist Initialed by the artist and annotated in pencil

An exceptionally rare and unique bon á tirer impression, hand-painted by the artist on a lithographic touch plate. With extensive annotations by the artist. Bon à tirer means “good to pull.” This is the first perfect impression of the work and the one that will be used to judge all other impressions in the edition. Annotated “Épreuve retouchée par Chagall” in pencil by master printmaker Charles Sorlier, lower left. Annotated and signed by Charles Sorlier verso, before the signed and numbered edition. From the folio of 42 lithographs for “Daphnis and Chloé” by Longus. Printed by Charles Sorlier at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris. Published by Tériade, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 312; Cramer no. 46 21 3/16 x 15 1/4 in. Framed dimensions: 41 x 33 3/8 in. 914777 $198,000 Daphnis and Chloé, a story of ancient origins (c. 3rd century AD,) written by a poet called Longus, tells the tale of a shepherd boy and girl who fall passionately in love—but encounter great trials and tribulations due to their tendencies to act, as the author says, even more awkwardly “than rams and ewes.” A fool for love himself, master artist Marc Chagall became fascinated with the romantic narrative and decided to create a series of compositions to accompany the story. As exemplified by Daphnis and Chloé: The Wolf Pit, 1961, Chagall excels in fashioning whimsical dreamscapes. Here, Chagall captures the moment in the narrative in which a ferocious she-wolf begins to attack animals from the flocks of neighboring fields. In response, the villagers decide to dig several pits—six feet wide and 24 deep. The pits were dug both on the mountains and plains and though they never succeeded in catch- ing the wolf, the villagers managed to kill a great number of goats, sheep and nearly Daphnis. Amidst all of the drama, a couple of he-goats became angry and began to brawl, resulting in one of the goat’s horns breaking. Daphnis then began to carelessly pursue the victor of the fight with a stick, landing them both in a pit. Daphnis melted into tears, fearful that no one would ever come to his rescue. Chloé, who had witnessed the entire event, came running to the pit. She begged a local cowherd to assist with the rescue operation and although they could not locate a rope to hoist him out, Chloé untied her breast band and allowed the

cowherd to lower it into the pit. As Chloé and the cowherd stood on the edge of the pit and pulled, Daphnis clung to the breast band and eventually emerged. They, too, rescued the he-goat and gifted him to the cowherd as a reward for saving Daphnis’s life. Daphnis and Chloé then returned home to find out how the rest of the goats and sheep were getting on. Chagall’s Daphnis and Chloé: The Wolf Pit flawlessly captures the drama and romance of this segment in a tale as old as time. A brilliant display of stylistic mastery and impeccable use of color, the composition continues to thrill con- temporary viewers. Galerie Michael is proud to present Daphnis and Chloé: The Wolf Pit, a piece worthy of a private, museum quality collection.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: Wedding Feast in the Nymphs’ Grotto, 1961 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist Initialed by the artist and annotated in pencil by Sorlier A unique, exceptionally vibrant bon à tirer impression, hand-painted by the artist on a lithographic touch plate. Annotated “Épreuve du bon à tirer” by Charles Sorlier, lower left. Annotated and signed by Charles Sorlier verso, before the signed and numbered edi- tion. From the folio of 42 lithographs for “Daphnis and Chloé” by Longus. Printed by Charles Sorlier at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris. Published by Tériade, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 348; Cramer no. 46 21 13/16 x 30 in. 914787 $298,000

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) La Femme du Peintre, 1971 Color lithograph on Arches wove paper Signed and numbered in pencil From the edition of 50, signed and numbered. A superb, richly-inked impression with vibrant colors. With margins. Mourlot 630 29 13/16 x 23 1/8 in. 914983 $118,000

Created in October 1971, this lithograph is an excellent example of Chagall’s distinct, masterful style and varied use of color. This lithograph memorializes an intimate scene that was likely a common occurrence in his home. Chagall was enthralled and devoted to both of his wives: his first wife (and muse) Bella Rosen- feld and his second (and third) wife Valentina “Vava” Brodsky, the driving inspiration for his later works and the female figure in this work. The way in which Chagall depicts their relationship with one another is a testament to his fidelity to his wife, Valentina, and his zeal towards his work, one that would last until he passed away in 1985 at the age of 97. The artist is seen painting a beautiful bouquet of flowers, the colors reflecting those of Valentina’s clothing- a nod to her direct influence on his creativity. Here, Chagall is sharing a truly intimate look at the incredible bond with a woman who proved to be his match in more ways than one. This sentimental window into the artist’s life is an exquisite work perfect for a Chagall connoisseur.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Le Chevalet aux Fleurs, 1976 Color lithograph on Arches wove paper Signed and numbered in pencil From the edition of 50, signed and numbered on Arches wove paper. A strong and fresh impression. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from the Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 838 29 13/16 x 19 15/16 in. Framed dimensions: 46 1/4 x 37 3/4 in. 914885 $69,800 Creating art was essential to Chagall’s being, as essential as the beating of his heart and breathing. Often Chagall expressed, “the day I stopped working, I will die.” By depicting himself in his studio as he works on a portrait of a woman with a tranquil smile (likely his wife Valentina), surrounded by a bounty of flowers, Chagall invites the viewer to intimately experience his process of painting from the heart and his ideal state of being. Women, figures floating in the window pane, a bouquet of flowers, a view of a green garden beyond—these are recurring images in his work that hold great importance for the artist and illustrate Chagall’s true oeuvre. Chagall and Valentina’s secluded home near Saint-Paul-de Vence, in France, was designed by the couple to be a place for productive work, but also for serenity. Chagall enjoyed peering out through the large windows in his studio to take in the beautiful citrus and olive trees just outside. The home was surrounded by trees and shrubbery, but few flowers. To inspire her husband, Valentina gathered flowers from outdoors to compose im- pressive and sophisticated floral arrangements indoors that peppered Chagall’s studio; seemingly surrounding Chagall in the very flowers he painted on his canvases.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Les Adolescents, 1975 Color lithograph on Arches wove paper Signed and numbered in pencil From the edition of 50, signed and numbered. A superb, richly-inked impression of this large lithograph with vibrant colors. With full margins. Mourlot 741 29 7/16 x 22 5/16 in. Framed dimensions: 45 1/4 x 38 1/2 in. 914982 $88,000 Despite all the troubles in our world, in my heart I have never given up on the love in which I was brought up or on man’s hope in love. In life, just as on the artist’s palette, there is but one single color that gives meaning to life and art—the color of love. –Marc Chagall Les Adolescents 1975, or “The Adolescents,” by Marc Chagall is undoubtedly one of the master artist’s most exquisite graphic works. Composed of a delightful blend of soft colors, the piece illustrates the profound joy of young love—an experience familiar to many. The Adolescents is by nature enchantingly nostalgic; it is a fond memory of a carefree day filled with lush greenery, birds, sunshine and love. Created many years after the loss of his first wife and muse, Bella Rosenfeld (m. 1915–1944) the piece features motifs of the natural world that the artist largely abandoned after Bella’s death. The loss of Bella in 1944 marked a significant transition in Chagall’s work—he previously inserted flowers into much of his illustrations of Bella, and suddenly stopped after her death. Here, (despite his union with Valentina Brodsky (m.1952–1985) during the piece’s conception,) the artist perhaps references his sweet Bella—the pair surrounded by the wonders of the natural world once more. Fur- thermore, in the bottom right corner of the composition. Chagall depicts a small image of an adult cradling a child. This too, is a reference to his relationship with Bella who blessed Chagall with a beautiful baby girl. In The Adolescents , the couple’s locked gaze of unabridged affection is moving and continues to evoke strong emotions in contemporary viewers across the globe. The piece strongly reflects the iconography of Chagall’s early work—bodies composed of lovely curves, a whimsical depiction of the natural world, and

lovers happily entangled in one another. Galerie Michael is delighted to present The Adolescents , a timeless composition characterized by passion and youthful exuberance, to collectors worldwide.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) L’Envolée magique, 1980 Color lithograph on Arches wove paper Signed and numbered in pencil From the series “Fourteen Large Lithographs of 1980.” From the signed and numbered edition of 50 on Arches wove paper. Published by Editions Maeght, Paris. This work is a wonderful example from this series, bursting with Chagallian imagery. Mourlot 980 46 x 29 5/8 in. Framed dimensions: 60 3/8 x 45 7/16 in. 914882 $98,000 In 1980, the publisher Aimé Maeght obtained some especially large lithostones and asked Chagall to make a few large scale lithographs. The request was very broad in nature, Maeght specifying neither a specific size nor theme for the group. The subject matter was left completely to Chagall. Initially Chagall was a bit reticent, but his desire to please Maeght spurred him on. Once Chagall grasped the project, he became completely absorbed in it, ultimately going far beyond the scope of Maeght’s request. Chagall asked master printmaker Charles Sorlier for the largest dimensions that the presses were capable of printing and proceeded from there. In the end, the project encompassed fourteen large, graceful and poetic lithographs, thirteen of which were printed in vibrant pastel tones, one was printed in black only. They are Chagall’s largest lithographs, and are each considered a masterpiece, inviting the viewer into the enchanting world of Marc Chagall. Together, each composition constitutes a complete summary of his most recognizable imagery, including loving couples, floral bouquets, animals, floating figures, and the familiar landscapes of Paris and Vitebsk, all presented in a monumental size. Many of Chagall’s works, including this one, can be considered incredi- bly autobiographical. Here, he depicts himself at the center of the composition, presenting flowers to his first love, Bella. Though Bella passed away decades before, Chagall often incorporated her into his artworks, symbolizing his unwavering love and devotion.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Paravent (Les fiancés aux deux bouquets), 1963 Color lithograph on wove paper.

A set of two incredibly rare trial proofs, created prior to the cutting and mounting to four waxed oak folding screens, per the artist’s specifications. Aside from the signed and numbered edition of 100. An extraordinary piece, worthy of a museum collection. Literature: André Sauret & Fernand Mourlot, Chagall lithogra- pher, Monte-Carlo, 1969, vol. III, 1962-1968, no. 390 (another ex- ample illustrated); Marc Chagall-Gérald Cramer, Thirty Years of Work and Friendship (another example illustrated); Marc Chagall National Biblical Message Museum, Nice, 1992, no. 144, pp. 11 & 35 (another example illustrated) Mourlot 390 Each: 63 1/8 x 46 3/4 in. 914887 $168,000 An exceptional work, Chagall spent months of research and labor, familiarizing himself with the decorative arts of the Far East, as well as all aspects of construction. Charles Sorlier worked alongside Chagall as his creative collaborator in the Mourlot atelier. When one opens the Sorlier catalogue raisonné, Paravent (Les fiancés aux deux bouquets) is the first artwork featured in the book, demonstrat- ing its paramount importance in Chagall’s graphic oeuvre and also in the graphic world.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Regards sur Paris: Quai de la Tournelle, 1960 Color lithograph on Arches wove paper Signed and numbered in pencil From the rare edition of 25 on Arches paper, signed and numbered, from the total tirage of 180. From the series, “Regards sur Paris”, featuring three color lithographs by Chagall illustrating the text of Gérard Bauër and the Goncourt Academy. The text of each writer includes three or four colored lithographs executed by ten different artists (Beaudin, Braque, Brianchon, Carzou, Masson, Picasso, Dunoyer de Segonzac, Van Dongen, Villon and Chagall. Published by André Sauret, Paris. Printed by Mourlot Frères, Paris. Considered by many to be one of Chagall’s most exceptional litho- graphs, fully saturated in color and executed masterfully. Mourlot 351; Cramer no. 53 18 7/8 x 25 3/4 in. Framed dimensions: 34 x 41 1/4 in. 914881 $78,000

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Composition: Nu et Coq, 1966 Monotype in colors on Japon ancien paper Signed upper left in ink The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by the Comité Chagall. Provenance: Gallery Moos, Toronto; Habsburg-Feldman, Geneva, November 24, 1987, lot 40 Literature: Jean Leymarie, Gérald Cramer, Marc Chagall: Monotypes, 1966-1975, Geneva, 1976, no. 214, p. 44, illustrated p. 45 Cramer no. 214 Framed dimensions: 34 1/4 x 38 in. 15 3/4 x 19 5/8 in. 914884 $178,000 A unique and strong example of Chagall’s mastery of the monotype medium, with rich, saturated colors. After a creative trial period in 1961, Chagall became passionate about monotype and its process, achieving some of his best results between 1962 and 1975. A monotype is a hand-pulled print from an original draw- ing or painting, created by inking an entire surface like metal, copper or zinc plate; even Plexiglas or glass could be used. The image was then transferred to paper using a printmaking press. The paper had to absorb all of the ink in order to realize only one print at the time. Even though a monotype is a pulled print, it is an original, never a reproduction. The success of the process is based on a fast execution, as the oil paint needed to remain liquid enough to be trans- ferred entirely to paper during the printing. It was an ideal medium for a painter who could work rapidly and directly, without erasures or overpaintings.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Le Christ au village, 1966 Monotype printed in colors on Japan paper Signed in black ink Provenance: Editions Gérald Cramer, Geneva, archive number 1979.631 Exhibition History: The Museum of Modern Art, “Chagall: Prints, Monotypes, Illustrated Books” November 22, 1979–January 28, 1980 Cramer no. 197 30 1/4 x 22 3/4 in. Framed dimensions: 40 5/8 x 36 3/8 in. 914015 $178,000

A rare and unique work with strong coloring, showcasing Chagall’s mastery of color as well as the monotype medium. “Le Christ au Village” contains many of the personal and religious symbols and images prevalent in much of his work. Chagall’s Jewish identity was important to him throughout his life, and much of his work can be described as an attempt to reconcile old Jewish traditions with styles of modernist art. However, he also occasionally drew on Christian themes, which appealed to his penchant for narrative and allegorical themes. In this work, one can identify the crucifixion of Jesus, which Chagall corresponds with the Holocaust, and Jews being persecuted by the Nazis. The small houses are representative of Vitebsk, and his fond memories of his homeland. Also, the artist himself is portrayed in the foreground, moving across the composition. After a trial in 1961, Chagall became passionate about monotype and his process, achieving some of his best results between 1962 and 1975. A monotype is a hand-pulled print from an original drawing or painting, created by inking an entire surface like metal, copper or zinc plate; even Plexiglas or glass could be used. The image was then transferred to paper using a printmaking press. The paper had to absorb all of the ink in order to realize only one print at a time. Even though a monotype is a pulled print, it is an original, never a reproduction. Each time a new print was desired, the colors had to be added to plate again. Therefore, every monotype was completely unique. Most major artists working in monotypes in the 20th century used only black ink, although the technique was one in which color could be brilliantly utilized, as shown in the present work. It was an ideal medium for a painter who could work rapidly and directly, without erasures or overpaintings. Speed was important since the oil paint, directly brushed onto a gleaming plate, must remain liquid enough to be transferred entirely to paper during the printing. The luminosity of the color, which remains thin and translucent, is the most characteristic quality of color monotypes, and this is a consistent achievement in the works of Chagall. Throughout his career, during which he produced an astounding 10,000 works, Chagall continued to incor- porate figurative and narrative elements into his artworks. His pictorial universe, full of personal metaphor, set him apart from much of 20th century art.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Les Toits, 1 956 Color lithograph and pencil on Arches wove paper Initialed and inscribed in pencil by the artist

An exceptionally rare bon à tirer impression, heavily annotated by Chagall, before the edition of 75, signed and numbered, plus proofs. Notes to the printer such as, “change the yellow,” “make the colors more fresh,” and to “make the faces without dots.” Inscribed and signed by master printmaker Charles Sorlier verso. Published by Maeght, Paris. Provenance: The artist; Gifted to printmaker Charles Sorlier; Galerie Michael Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from the Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 163 26 1/4 x 19 13/16 in. Framed dimensions: 46 3/8 x 39 5/8 in. 914628 $69,800 A unique bon à tirer impression, with extensive annotations by the artist. Bon à tirer means “good to pull.” This is the first perfect impression of the work and the one that will be used to judge all other impressions in the edition. Created in 1956, this unique bon à tirer artwork is an excellent example of Chagall’s style and varied use of color. It includes many of Chagall’s most iconic subjects, such as the clown, the artist himself over rooftops, the characteristic wooden architecture of Vitebsk, where the artist was born, and farm animals. All are deeply personal to his own narrative as an artist through childhood, war, Russia and into the world of modern art. ”Les Toits” (The Roof), though executed in Paris, captures the Russian village from the perspective of the night sky. The luminous, bright moon lights up an atmospheric, whimsical, dreamlike, sensuous scene. This amalgamation of symbolic imagery and vivid color combines into a single beautiful, magical scene. An exqui- site work essential for any Chagall connoisseur. This rare work is an exceptional example of the printmaking process, filled with rich colors, saturating the paper and illustrating Chagall’s lively vision with strong imagery.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Les trois acrobates , 1956 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist Annotated and initialed in pencil by the artist

A unique, vibrant, mixed media proof impression, hand-painted by the artist on a lithographic touch plate. Annotated “Épreuve d’essai litho tirée en noir rehaussée à la main par Chagall” by Charles Sorlier. Annotated and signed by Charles Sorlier verso, before the signed and numbered edition of 75.

Printed by Charles Sorlier at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris. Published by Maeght, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from the Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 169 25 3/4 x 19 3/4 in. Framed dimensions: 47 x 40 1/4 in. 914791 $148,000

Chagall’s first lithographs are dominated by his work with the brush - with regard to both the preliminary black drawing and subsequent orchestration of colors. This work is a perfect example of this process. The colors do not precisely fill-in the bold strokes of the brush, but flow and spatter playfully around the con- tours, achieving a painterly effect. The traveling acrobats at village fairs fascinated Chagall during childhood. After he moved to Paris, Chagall would frequent the circus with fellow artists. With a sketchbook in hand, he would capture the chaotic and vibrant atmosphere of the circus. Chagall expressed, “a circus is a magic show that appears and disappears like a world.”

CHAGALL, Marc, 1887-1985 L’Écuyère au cheval rouge, 1957 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist Initialed and annotated in pencil by the artist

A unique and rare mixed media bon à tirer impression, hand-painted by the artist on a lithographic touch plate. Signed by Charles Sorlier verso, before the signed and numbered edition of 75 on Arches paper, plus proofs. With multiple annotations in pencil by the artist, giving the printer Sorlier instructions. Published hors texte for the review ‘XXe Siècle’ No. 9, June 1957. Printed by Sorlier, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 191; Cramer no. 32 Framed dimensions: 38 1/4 x 31 in. 19 3/4 x 13 1/16 in. 914790 $198,000 A unique bon à tirer impression, with extensive annotations by the artist in pencil. Bon à tirer means “good to pull.” This is the first perfect impression of the work and the one that will be used to judge all other impressions in the edition. Amongst the art journals of the Modern period, there are three which stand out: Derrière le Miroir, Verve, and XXe Siècle. XXe Siècle’s creator, Gualtieri de San Lazzaro, sporadically produced the magazine, themed around a particular region or artist, commissioned with unique articles by leading thinkers, poets, as well as unique lithographic prints by the chosen artist for that edition. Gualtieri quickly became one of the key connecting figures of the Modernist movement and worked to make the art of these rising stars available for a much wider audience through these printings. However, there were only approximately sixty versions produced, making this magazine remarkably collectible for both amateur and professionals. This rare proof is an exceptional example of the printmaking process, filled with rich colors, saturating the paper and illustrating Chagall’s lively vision of the circus with strong imagery.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Moïse et les tables de la loi, 1962 Mixed media work on Arches paper, hand-painted by the artist A rare and unique proof, hand-painted by the artist on a lithographic touch plate. Created for the exhibition “Chagall et la Bible” at the Rath Museum, Geneva, from June 30 to August 26, 1962. Printed before the lettering, with additional hand-coloring by the artist. Annotated by Charles Sorlier in pencil “Épreuve lithographique repeinte par Chagall” , as well as annotated and signed by Sorlier verso, prior to the edition. Printed and published by Charles Sorlier at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris. Accompanied by a certificate of authen- ticity from Comité Marc Chagall. Mourlot 363 30 11/16 x 22 3/4 in. Framed dimensions: 51 1/4 x 43 in. 914794 $298,000 Marc Chagall’s fascination with religion greatly inspires much of his work. Chagall felt a deep connection to his Hasidic heritage and embraces both Christian and Jewish themes in his work. His unification of these two separate religions reminds his viewers of their familiar origins. The visual metaphors he uses to depict his faith reflects his wish to convey a universal message of reconciling of differences. Moise et les tables de la loi t ranslates to “Moses and the Tables of the Law” and depicts the biblical figure Moses receiving the stone Tablets of the Law from God. Here, Chagall blends Cubism with a folk-like style to create a romantic world in contrast with the grim everyday life of the Hasidic Jews. In this biblical scene, Moses gazes upward at the hand reaching out from the heavens. The darker shades of the background con- trast with the yellow and white hues of Moses, the Tables of the Law, and the hand reaching from heaven. This juxtaposition reveals Moses and the heavens as symbols of light amidst the darkness of the human con- dition. The composition is crowded which skews space and depth and speaks to the chaos of the earthly realm. As a whole, Moses et les tables de la loi invites the viewer to explore how their own vision of faith relates to their personal experiences and biases. Although there are restrictions which surround the pictorial depiction of many religious subjects, Chagall was able to combine his fantasy images and folk style to visually interpret his personal experience with faith.

Mid-Range

Marc Chagall was fascinated with classical stories of old, love, the circus, and his Jewish roots. From rare early proofs and deluxe editions to etchings on paper, each work is an example of the artistic talents showcased by a Modern Master. Chagall stood out as a colorist who could express his rich imagination with an equally rich palette of colors—one layered upon the next until his vision was fully captured. Whether his subject was his quiet and unending love of his muse and wife, Bella, or his spontaneous love of the dynamic energy on display at the circus, or his eternal love of Judaism, Chagall always found ways to creatively express himself. These works are mid-range only in terms of affordability. They are remarkable in terms of being insights into the mind of a genius.

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Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: Daphnis and Gnathon, 1961 Color lithograph on wove paper From the portfolio, ‘Daphnis and Chloé’, comprising 42 lithographs. From the edition of 250, aside from the I-XX numbered edition, plus proofs. Printed by Mourlot. Published by Verve, Paris. Mourlot 343; Cramer no. 46 16 1/2 x 12 5/8 in. Framed dimensions: 33 3/4 x 29 1/2 in.

908478A $12,900

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: The Summer Season, 1961 Color lithograph on Arches wove paper Signed and numbered in pencil

From the complete portfolio, “Daphnis and Chloé,” comprising 42 lithographs. From the rare deluxe edition of 60 on Arches paper, each signed and numbered in pencil. Aside from the edition of 250, and the I-XX numbered edition. Printed by Mourlot. Published by Tériade, Paris. Mourlot 337; Cramer no. 46 16 1/2 x 12 5/8 in. Framed dimensions: 34 1/4 x 28 3/4 in. 914987 $32,800

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: Lamon Discovers Daphnis, 1961 Color lithograph on Arches paper

From the portfolio, “Daphnis and Chloé,” comprising 42 lithographs. A rare early proof impression prior to the edition. Held by the publisher Tériade from 1961 to 2017. Virtually impossible to duplicate, the colors extraor- dinarily rich and luminous, as the work has never seen the light of day. Outside the edition of 250, and the I-XX numbered edition. Printed by Mourlot. Published by Tériade, Paris. Provenance: The artist; Mourlot Atelier, Paris; Tériade, Paris Mourlot 309; Cramer no. 46 16 5/8 x 12 5/8 in. Framed dimensions: 33 3/4 x 29 1/2 in. 914587 $12,900 When it was suggested to Marc Chagall that he illustrate the fable of Daphnis & Chloé, he began his preparation by making two trips to Greece. He was delighted with the tale, which analyzed the simple, mutual passion of two abandoned children who are raised by a shepherd. The children are protected by nymphs and the god, Pan, and finally marry after being cruelly separated for a time because of the abduction of the maiden by a pirate. The work on the preliminary sketches and gouaches for the series involved Chagall in multiple trips Greece; in the course of these excursions, he fell in love with the Greek sea, archaic sculpture, Greek landscape, and especially Greek light. Charles Sorlier, the colorist for the project, hand-mixed the color palette Chagall used in this suite. He and Chagall worked together to develop new blues and greens to meet Chagall’s vision of this paradisiacal story. Chagall also experimented with surface textures. It was standard at the time this suite was published in 1961 to use approximately 3 to 6 lithographic stones in creating a single print. Chagall generally used 25-30 individual stones per print in the Daphnis & Chloé suite creating the density and layering of color, which is so unique and rich. They are the most complex color lithographs ever created by any artist. Charles Sorlier went on to become a printmaker in his own name; interestingly, he referred to himself as a ‘color therapist’.

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: Temple and History of Bacchus, 1961 Color lithograph on wove paper From the portfolio, “Daphnis and Chloé”, comprising 42 lithographs. From the edition of 250, aside from the I-XX numbered edition, plus proofs. Printed by Mourlot. Published by Verve, Paris. A brilliant, richly-inked impression of this large print with vibrant colors. Mourlot 346; Cramer no. 46 16 1/2 x 25 1/4 in. Framed dimensions: 35 1/4 x 43 in. 914980 $19,800

Marc CHAGALL (1887-1985) Daphnis and Chloé: Spring, 1961

Color lithograph on Arches wove paper Double page from the folio of 42 litho- graphs for “Daphnis et Chloé” by Longus. A proof without the central vertical fold, aside from the unsigned edition of 250 (there was also a signed and numbered edition of 60 with margins.) Printed by Mourlot, Paris. Published by Tériade, Paris. Printed to the edges of the full sheet. The colors fresh and vibrant. Mourlot 335; Cramer no. 46 16 1/2 x 25 in. Framed dimensions: 36 3/8 x 44 5/8 in. 915296 $23,800

CHAGALL, Marc, 1887-1985 Le Cirque, 1967 Color lithograph on Vélin d’Arches paper From the suite “Le Cirque,” comprising 38 litho- graphs featuring animated, lively scenes from the circus. An excellent impression from the edition of

250. Printed by Mourlot, Paris. Published by Teriade, Paris. Mourlot 517 16 5/8 x 25 1/2 in. 915573 $24,800 “The Circus:

Vollard asked Chagall to make a book about the circus and he did finish 19 gouaches intended for it, but both men were already thinking about another subject, the illustration of the Bible. So the circus project was given up. Thirty years later the same idea was still going round in Chagall’s head when he settled down to engrave this book. Perhaps that is the secret of these mag- nificent plates which sprang from his brush without apparent effort, but which had already taken shape in his mind long years before. This book, measuring 420 x 320, contains 23 co- loured lithographs, 3 of them double-paged, and 15 black and white lithographs. All 38 plates fill the whole page without margins. 250 copies of the book, numbered 1 to 250, were printed on Vélin d’Arches paper, and 20 copies not for sale, with Roman numerals from 1 to 20, were kept for those who had worked on the book. The artist signed all the copies. A few proofs of the 23 coloured lithographs were also printed with wide margins, and kept for the artist and the editor.” -Editions Verve - Paris, 1967

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