Demographics Report 2014

UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014 OIL&GASUK

UKCONTINENTAL SHELF OFFSHOREWORKFORCE DEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

Contents

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Foreword

5 6 7 8

Summaryof Findings

Introduction

TotalOffshoreWorkforce

CoreWorkforce 16 5.1 ComparativeTrendsof theCoreWorkforce 19 6. Residential Locations andNationalities of theWorkforce 23 6.1 Residential Locations 23 6.2 WorkforceNationalities 24 7. FemaleWorkforce 26 8. WorkforceAgeAnalysis 29

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

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1. Foreword This is the eighth annual UKContinental Shelf (UKCS) OffshoreWorkforceDemographics Report in a series dating back to 2006. Since the report was first published, we have seen the offshoreworkforce grow year-on-year and 2013wasnoexception. Considering the record levels of investment in the UK oil and gas industry last year of £14.4 billion 1 , this is perhaps not surprising, but given the reduction in helicopter capacity following suspension of the EC225Super Pumas, this rise in theoffshoreworkforcewasnot a foregone conclusion. This latest report continues to provide useful insights into the profile and composition of the offshore workforce, which is important in understanding current trends and enhancing forward planning. There is good news on the average age front, but increasing the proportion of female offshore workers is still proving to be a challenge. With several decades of oil and gas production on the UKCS ahead of us, this lack of gender diversity represents an untapped pool of talent and the industry must continue to work towards solving this conundrum. With the support of both theUK and ScottishGovernments, we continue to address thewell-documented skills shortage in the sector, by raising awareness of the diverse, stimulating and rewarding career opportunities available; encouraging the uptake of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects in schools; and supporting the transition of skilled personnel from other sectors, such as the armed forces and shipbuilding, intoour great industry.

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Wehopeyoufind this reportof interest andwouldwelcomeyour feedback. If youhaveanyqueries, pleasedirect them toOil&GasUK’s employment and skills issuesmanager, DrAlixThom, onathom@oilandgasuk.co.uk.

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DrAlixThom Oil&GasUK’s employment and skills issuesmanager

1. Oil&GasUK’sActivity Survey2014 is available todownloadat:www.oilandgasuk.co.uk/forecasts.cfm

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

2. Summaryof Findings

Thedataused in thisreportaredrawn from theVantagePersonnelOnBoard (POB)systemandhavebeenanalysed to identify trends in theUKoil andgasoffshoreworkforce.

• A total of 61,892 people travelled offshore in 2013, which is the highest since 2006when the data were first analysedand represents an8.6per cent increaseon2012.

• The number of core workers (those working over 100 nights a year offshore) rose to 27,749 in 2013 representing a 7.7 per cent increase from 2012 and is at its highest since 2006. The core workforce continues to represent around45per cent of the total offshorepopulation.

• The total number of personnel travelling offshore continued to rise despite the average oil price dropping by$3 to$109per barrel in2013 2 .

• Almost 50 per cent (13,740) of the core workforce visited a single offshore location in 2013 and nearly72per cent (19,880)worked for a singleoperator.

• Just over 80 per cent (51,177) of the total number of workers travelling offshore are of British nationality, with Norwegians representing the greatest number of non-British personnel workingon theUKContinental Shelf.

• The femaleworkforce constitutes 3.6per cent (2,237) of the total offshorepopulation,with30per cent of themworking in catering roles. This represents adecreaseof almost 0.2per cent from2012.

• The average age of the total offshoreworkforce in 2013was 40.8 years. This is down from 41.1 years in 2012, but still broadly similar to theaverageage recordedover the last eight years.

• 2013 saw a 14.7 per cent increase in the number of workers travelling offshore aged 23 to 28 and a nineper cent increase inpersonnel aged60 to65.

• Thenumber of personnelworking for contractors in2013 increasedacross all age categories.

2. Oil&GasUK’sActivity Survey2014 is available todownloadat:www.oilandgasuk.co.uk/forecasts.cfm

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3. Introduction

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This report provides an up-to-date analysis of demographics data for the offshore workforce on the UKContinental Shelf (UKCS) between2006and2013.

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The offshore population comprises a core workforce, defined as those who work offshore for 100 nights or more in one calendar year, and those who have travelled offshore for at least one but less than 100 nights. Dataareextracted from theVantagePersonnel onBoard (POB) systemwhich tracks themovement of personnel toand fromoffshore installations. The reportwill consider thedifferences that arisebetween the core and total workforce andbetweenoperators and contractors, as well as analysing theworkers’ UK residential locations, the nationalities represented by the workforce, the femaledemographic and theageprofileof theworkforceandhow thishas changed.

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

4. TotalOffshoreWorkforce Thecoreoffshoreworkforceaccounts for justover sixpercent (27,749)of thetotal numberofemployees 3 working in,orasaresultof, theUKoffshoreoilandgas industry.Thisfigureincreasestoalmost14percentwhencalculating the total offshoreworkforceas apercentageof theoverallworkforce in2013.

Figure1: BreakdownofOnshoreandOffshorePersonnel in2013

6%

8%

RemainingWorkforce (Onshore) Non-CoreOffshorePersonnel CoreOffshorePersonnel

86%

Source: VantagePOB

Atotal of 61,892workers travelledoffshoreon theUKCS in2013, thehighest number since2006whendatawere first analysedandan8.6per cent increase from2012when56,982employees travelledoffshore.

Whilst this is not the highest year-on-year increase since this report has been produced, it is arguably a higher than expected figure given the reduction in helicopter capacity resulting from the suspension of the entire Super Puma fleet on 23 October 2012 following a helicopter ditching on the UKCS the day before. This suspensionwas lifted on certain AS332L, L1 and L2 variant helicopters on 26 October 2012with a phased reintroductionof theEC225model 4 . The reduction inhelicopter seat capacitywas compoundedwhen, on23August 2013, therewas a fatal accident involving a Super Puma L2 which resulted in the tragic death of four offshore workers. As a result of this, the Helicopter Safety Steering Group (HSSG) 5 recommended the temporary precautionary grounding of the entire Super Puma fleet. This was implemented throughout the industry but, within seven days, with no evidence to support thecontinuedsuspension, the temporarygroundingended. 3. Oil&GasUK’s EconomicReport 2013 cites 450,000 jobs supportedby the industry. This includes those employedbyoperating companies; thoseemployed in the supply chain; jobs inducedby theactivityof the industry; and those involved in theexport of goods andservices. The report is available todownloadat www.oilandgasuk.co.uk/publications/viewpub.cfm?frmPubID=753 4. StepChange in Safety’sG-CHCNHelicopterDitching Incident Fact Sheet canbedownloadedat www.stepchangeinsafety.net/templates/asset-relay.cfm?frmAssetFileID=1568 5. TheHelicopter SafetySteeringGroup (HSSG) is abodywithin the industry’s StepChange inSafety initiative. Its remit is toworkproactively to identifyandaddress cross-industry issues aroundhelicopter safety, related tohelicopter operations in theUKoil andgas industry.

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Figure2: Total Number of PersonnelwhoTravelledOffshore from2006 to2013

1

64,000

2

62,000

60,000

58,000

3

56,000

54,000

4

Number of Personnel

52,000

50,000

5

48,00 0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Source: VantagePOB

Source: VantagePOB

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Between 2010 and 2013, therewas a sharp rise in the number of offshore personnel, however, upon analysing the data there does not appear to be a significant increase in any particular discipline or area of offshorework. The rise inmanpower couldbeattributed tomaintenanceprogrammes, upgradesandkeyprojects takingplace in 2013, togetherwith record capital investment of £14.4billion in the industry.

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

Figure 3 below illustrates the distribution of the total offshoreworkforce between thoseworking for operators and thoseworking for contractors.

In 2013, the number of personnel working for operators increased by 4.2 per cent to 12,971. Whilst this is a smaller year-on-year increase than from 2011 to 2012, which saw a 4.8 per cent rise, it is nevertheless a positive trend. A total of 48,921 personnel worked for contractors in 2013, which represents almost 80 per cent of the total offshoreworkforce, and an increase of almost 10 per cent from2012 and 15.6 per cent from2006.

Figure3: Total Personnel TravellingOffshore forOperatorsandContractors from2006 to2013

70,000

Operators Contractors Total

60,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

Number of Personnel

20,000

10,000

0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Source: VantagePOB Source: VantagePOB

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Of the total offshore workforce in 2013, 16.2 per cent (10,035) travelled offshore for ten nights or less. Thenon-coreworkforce(whoworklessthan100nightsperyearoffshore)arelikelytobeonshore-basedpersonnel witha requirement to carry out ad-hoc trips tooffshore locations. Figure4 also takes intoaccount newstarts to thecoreworkforcewhoareyet tospend100nightsoffshore.

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Figure4: TheNumber ofNights SpentOffshoreby theNon-CoreWorkforce in2012and2013

12,000

3

10,000

8,000

4

2013 2012

6,000

5

4,000

Number of Personnel

2,000

6

0

0-10 11-20 21-30 31-40 41-50 51-60 61-70 71-80 81-90 91-100

Source: VantagePOB

Number ofNights

Source: VantagePOB

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

In previous years there appeared to be a correlation between the number of personnel working offshore and the oil price, with a time lag of one year (see Figure 5 below). If this trend was to continue, we would have seenaplateau in thenumberof personnel in2013.However, thenumberof offshoreworkershas continued to increase,while theaverageoilpricesatat$109 (adecreaseof$3perbarrel from2012), thereforedisconnecting theapparent correlationbetweenoffshorepersonnel and theoil price.

Figure5: TheTotal Number of Personnel TravellingOffshorebetween2006and2013 Versus theAverageOil Price

200

42,00 0 44,000 46,000 48,000 50,000 52,000 54,000 56,000 58,000 60,000 62,000 64,000

180

160

140

120

100

80

60

Number of Personnel

40

Total Numberof Personnel

AverageOil Priceper $per Barrel

Oil Price /$

20

0

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: VantagePOB Source: VantagePOB

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Acontinuingtrendisapparentwithregardstothenumberofoffshorelocationsvisitedandthenumberofoperators workedfor (seeFigures6and7). Fiftyper centof thetotal offshoreworkforcetravelledtoasingle location in2013 and67per centworked for a singleoperator. Thesefigures are similar to2012when49per cent travelled toone locationand65per centworked for a singleoperator.

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Figure6: TheNumber of LocationsVisitedby theTotalOffshoreWorkforce in2013

3

4% 3% 2% 1% 1% 2%

6%

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10+

11%

4

50%

5

20%

6

Source: VantagePOB Source: VantagePOB

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Figure7: TheNumber ofOperatorsWorked for by theTotalOffshoreWorkforce in2013

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0%

4% 2% 2%

8%

0 1 2 3 4 5 6+

17%

67%

Source: VantagePOB Source: VantagePOB

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

Similar to2012, the largest proportionof the total offshoreworkforce travelled to the central North Sea in2013. This isclosely followedbythosetravellingtomultiplesectors.Multiplesectorworkersarethosewhohavetravelled tomore thanone regionon theUKCS.

Figure8:Geographical Distributionof theTotalOffshoreWorkforceon theUKContinental Shelf

West of Shetland

No. ofMales& Females

No. ofMales No. of Females

NorthernNorthSea

2,151

2,059

92

No. ofMales& Females

%of Total Workforce

No. ofMales No. of Females

3.4

3.3

0.1

7,742

7,479

263

%of Total Workforce 12.5

12.1

0.4

Central NorthSea

No. ofMales& Females

No. ofMales No. of Females

29,764

28,523

1,241

%of Total Workforce 48.1

46.1

2.0

MorecambeBay

No. ofMales& Females

No. ofMales No. of Females

1,359

1,306

53

%of Total Workforce

2.2

2.1

0.1

SouthernNorthSea

No. ofMales& Females

No. ofMales No. of Females

6,469

6,227

242

%of Total Workforce 10.5

10.1

0.4

MultipleSectors

No. ofMales& Females

No. ofMales No. of Females

14,407

14,061

346

%of Total Workforce 23.3

22.7

0.6

Source: VantagePOB

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Figure9 shows thehighest percentage increase from2006 to2013was formalepersonnelworking in thewest of Shetlandwitha79.7percent increase.Bothmaleand femaleworkershave increased inall areasexcept for females inmultiple sectorswhere theyhavedecreasedby10.1per cent from2006 to2013. Therehasbeena largerpercentagerise inwomenworking inthenorthern,centralandsouthernNorthSea, together with theMorecambeBay area,when comparedwith theirmale colleagues. However, the very small basenumber forwomenmeans that a small increase innumbersequates toahighpercentage change.

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Figure9:Difference in theGeographical Distributionof theTotalWorkforcebetween2006and2013

Sectors

2006

2013

%Difference 2006 to2013

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No.Males No. Females No.Males

No. Females No.Males

No. Females

Central NorthSea Northern NorthSea Southern NorthSea

21,805

903

28,523

1,241

30.8

37.4

5

6,255

181

7,479

263

19.6

45.3

5,522

208

6,227

242

12.8

16.3

6

Morecambe Bay 6

814

30

1,306

53

60.4

76.7

West of Shetland

1,146

63

2,059

92

79.7

46.0

7

12,959

385

14,061

346

8.5

-10.1

MultipleSectors

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Source: VantagePOB

6. EarliestMorecambeBayfigures recordedare from2009andnot 2006

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

5. CoreWorkforce Thecoreworkforce isdefinedas thosewhoworkoffshore forover100nights inacalendaryear.Themostcommon rotationpatterns for thecoreworkforce isequal time (twoweekson, twoweeksoff/threeweekson, threeweeks off) or twoweekson, threeweeksoff. Thenumberofcorepersonnelhas risen from25,760 in2012 to27,749 in2013, representinga7.7percent increase. This thehighest number of coreworkers sincedatawerefirst analysed in2006, albeitwith a smaller percentage rise from2012 to2013 than from2011 to2012,which stoodat 8.4per cent. Despite thedecrease inexplorationdrillingandan increase inoperatingcosts in2013, thecoreoffshoreworkforce continues to rise year-on-year. As mentioned earlier in the report, this could be due to increased manpower needed for maintenance programmes, upgrades and key projects, as well as record capital investment of £14.4billion last year innewandbrownfielddevelopments 7 .

Figure10:Number of CorePersonnel TravellingOffshore from2006 to2013

30,000

25,000

20,000

15,000

10,000

Number of CorePersonnel

5,000

0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Source: VantagePOB

Source: VantagePOB

7. Oil&GasUK’sActivity Survey2014 is available todownloadat:www.oilandgasuk.co.uk/forecasts.cfm

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Over thepasteightyears, the lowestpercentageof coreworkforceasaproportionof thetotal offshoreworkforce was just over 39 per cent in 2006 and the highest being 45 per cent in 2012. The core workforce continues to account for almost 45per cent of the total offshoreworkforce in2013.

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Figure11: Total VersusCorePersonnelOffshore from2006 to2013

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70,000

TotalWorkforce CoreWorkers

3

60,000

50,000

4

40,000

30,000

5

20,000 Number of Personnel

6

10,000

0

7

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Source: VantagePOB Source: VantagePOB

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

Figure 12 shows a similar picture to 2012 regarding the number of locations the coreworkforce visited in 2013. Again, almost 50per cent (13,740) of the coreworkforce travelledoffshore toa single locationwith themajority stillworking for a singleoperator. There is a twoper cent increase inpersonnel travelling to three locations.

Figure12: TheNumber of LocationsVisitedOffshoreby theCoreWorkforce in2013

3% 2% 1% 1% 3%

3%

6%

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10+

11%

50%

20%

Source: VantagePOB

Source: V ntagePOB

Figure13: TheNumber ofOperatorsWorked for by theCoreWorkforce in2013

4% 2% 3%

6%

13%

1 2 3 4 5 6+

72%

Source: VantagePOB Source: VantagePOB

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5.1 ComparativeTrendsof theCoreWorkforce Last year’s Demographics Report speculated that the level of core offshore personnel would plateau in 2013 if the previously observed correlation with the oil price held true; however, this has not been the case. Instead, therewas an increaseof 7.7per cent in thenumber of coreworkers last yearwhile the averageoil price droppedby2.7per cent ($3),which refutes theapparent correlationpreviouslyobserved.

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Figure14: TheNumber of CorePersonnel TravellingOffshore between2006and2013Versus theOil Price

3

30,000

120

4

25,000

100

20,000

80

5

15,000

60

6

10,000

40

Oil Price / $per Barrel

CorePersonnel Oil Price /$

Number of CorePersonnel

5,000

20

7

0

0

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

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Source: VantagePOB

Source: VantagePOB

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

As in 2012, although production and drilling activity declined, the core workforce travelling offshore increased last year.

Production levels fell by almost eight per cent in 2013 from 2012, an improvement when compared with the average decline of 15 per cent per year experienced from 2010 to 2012. The UKCS produced an average of 1.43millionbarrelsofoilequivalent(boepd)perdayover2013.Overthe lastthreeyears,productionhasdeclinedby 38per cent, butwith the combinationof newfield start-ups, fields coming back on-stream andongoingwork to improveproductionefficiency, it is expected tobegin topickup in2014 8 .

Figure15: TheRelationshipbetween theNumber of CoreWorkers andProductionFigures from2006 to2013

30,000

5

4.5

25,000

4

3.5

20,000

3

CoreWorkers

Production

2.5

15,000

2

10,000

Number of Personnel

1.5

Production (Millionboepd)

1

5,000

0.5

0

0

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: VantagePOB,Oil&GasUK, DECC Source: VantagePOB,Oil&GasUK, DECC

8. Oil&GasUK’sActivity Survey2014 is available todownloadat:www.oilandgasuk.co.uk/forecasts.cfm

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Figure16: TheRelationshipbeween theNumber of CoreWorkersandDrillingActivity from2006 to2013

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30,000

350

2

300

25,000

Appraisal Exploration

250

20,000

Development CoreWorkers

3

200

15,000

150

4

Number ofWells

10,000

Number of Personnel

100

5,000

50

5

0

0

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Source: VantagePOB

Source: VantagePOB, DECC

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Figure17: TheRelationshipbetween theNumber of CoreWorkers andOverall Expenditure from2006 to2013

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30,000

30

Exploration&Appraisal Costs

Development Costs

25,000

25

OperatingCosts

CoreWorkers

20,000

20

15,000

15

10,000

10

Number of Personnel

£Billion in2013Money

5,000

5

0

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 0

Source: VantagePOB Source: VantagePOB,Oil&GasUK

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

Figure18: TheRelationshipbetween theNumber of CoreWorkersand theOperating andCapital ExpenditureCosts from2006 to2013

16

30,000

OperatingCosts

Capital Expenditure

CoreWorkers

14

25,000

12

20,000

10

8

15,000

6

10,000

Number of Personnel

4

£Billion in2013Money

5,000

2

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 0

0

Source: VantagePOBandOil&GasUK

Source: VantagePOB,Oil&GasUK

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6. Residential Locations andNationalitiesof theWorkforce 6.1 Residential Locations Figure 19maps theUK home addresses of personnel working on theUKCS in 2013. Just over 49 per cent of the offshore workforce resides in Scotland, with 28 per cent living in the north east specifically. The north east of England ishome to16per cent of the total offshoreworkforce.

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Figure19: AMap Illustrating theUKHomeAddressesof allWorkerson theUKContinental Shelf

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5

6

7

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

6.2 WorkforceNationalities In 2013, 51,177 of the personnel who travelled offshore were of British nationality, which is an increase of 8.4 per cent from 2012when therewere 47,192 British personnel offshore. This represents 82.7 per cent of the 2013 total offshoreworkforce, a 0.1 per cent decrease from 2012 and a 3.9 per cent decrease from 2006when Britishworkersmadeup86.6per cent of the totalworkforce.

Figure20: TheNumber ofOffshoreWorkersof BritishNationality from2006 to2013

52,000

50,000

48,000

46,000

44,000

Number of Personnel

42,000

40,00 0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Source: VantagePOB

Figure 21 illustrates that theUKCSworkforce remains as diverse as ever, showing the nationalities of thosewhowork offshore.WorkersfromcountriessuchasBangladesh,ElSalvador,Korea,UgandaandYemen joinedtheworkforce in2013.

Figure21: AMapShowing theNationalitiesWorkingOffshoreon theUKContinental Shelf. TheCountries Shown in LightGreenareRepresentedbyEmployees

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The breakdown of non-British nationalities working offshore on the UKCS is provided in Figure 22 below. The followingobservations in comparison to2012havebeenmade:

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•Thegreatest number of non-Britishworkerswas still theNorwegians, followedby theDutch. •The rankings in the top ten for PolishandAmericanworkershave changed,with thenumber of Polish personnel increasingby0.4per cent and thenumber of Americanworkersdecreasingby0.2per cent. •Romanianworkers arenow in the top tenof non-Britishnationalitiesworkingon theUKCS. Thiswas arguablymore likely toappear in the2015 DemographicsReport given the change in immigration legislation,which came into forceon1 January2014, allowingRomaniannationals toworkwithin the EUwithout theprevious restrictions.

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Figure22: TheTopTenNon-BritishNationalitiesWorkingon theUKContinental Shelf

4

Nationality

Proportion

No. of Personnel

1.Norwegian

1,729 1,083

16.1% 10.1%

2. Dutch 3. Polish

5

514 478 445 273 256 241 191 191

4.8% 4.5% 4.2% 2.5% 2.4% 2.2% 1.8% 1.8%

4. American (USA)

5. Irish

6

6. French 7. Danish

8. Lithuanian 9. Romanian 10. Canadian

7

Other

5,124

47.8%

Total Number of Non-BritishEmployees

10,715

8

Source: VantagePOB

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

7. FemaleWorkforce Therewasanadditional 99femaleworkers travellingoffshore in2013comparedtothepreviousyear, bringingthe total to2,237. This is in comparison to theadditional 4,811maleworkers on theUKCS (bringing the total ofmale workers to59,655). Despitetheincreaseinactualnumbers, lastyearsawa0.2percentdecreaseintheproportionof femaleemployees relativetothetotal offshorepopulation, comparedtoa0.1per cent increase in2012. Femalepersonnel therefore accountedforonly3.6percentof thetotaloffshoreworkforcein2013and2.9percent (798)of thecoreworkforce. Thispercentage reflects the lowest level of femaleoffshorepersonnel in relation to the totalworkforce since the first DemographicsReport published in2006. Gender diversity is still an area of concernwith regards to the offshoreworkforce, especiallywhen the females working in catering are removed. Thirtyper cent of femaleswhoworkedoffshore in2013were in catering roles, thehighest percentage since2009. Tenper centwere inmaintenancepositions, four per centweremedical staff and1.6per centworked ingeosciences.

Figure23: Breakdownof FemalePersonnel byKeyDiscipline

30%

Catering Maintenance Other

60%

10%

Source: VantagePOB Source: VantagePOB

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Figure24: AComparisonof theTotal Number of FemaleWorkerswith those in Non-CateringRolesbetween2006and2013

1

2,500

2

2,000

3

1,500

4

1,000

Number of Personnel

5

500

ExcludingCatering All Female

6

0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Source: VantagePOB Source: VantagePOB

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Figure25: TheTotal Number of FemaleWorkersand those inNon-CateringRolesbetween2006and2013

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Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

All

ExcludingCatering

1,756 1,881 1,887 1,895 1,833 1,930 2,138 2,237

1,279 1,386 1,362 1,326 1,289 1,371 1,539 1,559

Source: VantagePOB

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UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

The distribution of females across the various age ranges shows the highest number of females remains in the 24 to29agebracket. Fromtheageof 30, there is adecline in thenumber of females travellingoffshore.

Therehas beenadecrease from2012 in the35 to39 agebracket by fiveper cent anda fall of 40per cent in the 65+agebracket.Whilethe latterpercentageseemsexceptionallyhigh, it is important tonotethat therewereonly five females over 65 yearsworking offshore in 2012 and this has dropped to three in 2013. The highest increase occurred inthe60to64agebracketwitha60per cent rise. Again, theactual numbersare low; anadditional nine femalesbrings the total in2013 to24up from15.

Figure26: FemaleOffshorePopulationVersusMalePopulation, 2013

12,000

10,000

8,000

Female Male

6,000

4,000

Number of Personnel

2,000

Under 18 18 - 23 24 - 29 30 - 34 35 - 39 40 - 44 45 - 49 50 - 54 55 - 59 60 - 64 65+ Female 0 154 622 440 295 271 197 164 67 24 3 Male 20 3,708 10,000 8,956 7,403 7,981 7,392 6,388 4,685 2,514 608 0

Age

Source: VantagePOB Source: VantagePOB

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8. WorkforceAgeAnalysis In 2013, the average age of the offshore worker was 40.8 years. This is slightly lower than 2012 but has remained fairly constant since 2006, staying in the range of 40 to 41 years. This further dispels the myth of an ageing offshore workforce. Again, the highest percentage growth can be seen in the lower age brackets of 23 to35years.

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2

Figure27: TheAgeProfileof theOffshoreWorkforce from2010 to2013

3

2,500

2013Figures 2012Figures 2011Figures 2010Figures

4

2,000

1,500

5

1,000

Number of Personnel

500

6

0

18 23 28 33 38 43 48 53 58 63 68 73

Age

Source: VantagePOB

Source: VantagePOB

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Figure28belowcompares thenumber ofworkers in the23 to28and60 to65agegroups. In2013, therewas an almost 14.7per cent (from7,940 to9,111) rise inworkers in the23 to28agebracket incomparison toonlyanine per cent (from3,083to3,362) increase inthoseagedbetween60and65. Thiscompares to12per centandsixper cent, respectively, in2012.

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Figure28: TheNumber ofWorkersAged23 to28Comparedwith thoseAged60 to65 in2013

2,500

2,000

9,111Workers Aged23 to28

1,500

1,000

Number ofWorkers

3,362Workers Aged60 to65

500

0

18 23 28 33 38 43 48 53 58 63 68 73

Age

Source: VantagePOB

Source: VantagePOB

page29

UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

The differences in the total workforce between 2006 and 2012 and 2006 and 2013 are compared in Figure 29. Themost acutechange isevident inthe24to29agebracketwithadifferenceof 1,614workers. There isadecline through mid-career age brackets and a trend which starts to reverse in the 50 to 54 age category. The most prominent reversal is in the60 to64agebracketwhere there is an increaseof 705personnel from2006 to2012 but only443personnel from2006 to2013.

Figure29: TheChange in theNumber ofWorkers inEachAgeRange for theTotalWorkforce between2006and2013andbetween2006and2012

4,000

3,500

3,000

2006-2013 2006-2012

2,500

2,000

1,500

1,000

Change in theNumber ofWorkers

500

0

Under 18

18 - 23 24 - 29 30 - 34 35 - 39 40 - 44 45 - 49 50 - 54 55 - 59 60 - 64 65+

Age

Source: VantagePOB

page30

Figures for coreworkers in the 30 to 34 age range showthe biggest change from2006 to 2013with an increase of 1,739 workers, closely followed by the 24 to 29 age range with 1,715 personnel (see Figure 30). In terms of percentage increase, the30 to34agebracket showsa45per cent rise from2006 to2013,withthe65+agerange presenting a greater increase of 74.3 per cent. It is, however, important to note that the number of personnel in the 65+ category is much less than in most other categories. The lowest percentage increases are in the mid-career age brackets,which supports thebelief that thereare shortages in theworkforceamong thoseaged between35and54.

1

2

Figure30: TheChange in theNumber of CoreWorkers inEachAgeRangebetween2006and2013

3

2,000

1,800

4

1,600

1,400

1,200

5

1,000

800

600

6

400

Change in theNumber of Personnel

200

0

7

Under 18

18 -­‐ 23 24 -­‐ 29 30 -­‐ 34 35 -­‐ 39 40 -­‐ 44 45 -­‐ 49 50 -­‐ 54 55 -­‐ 59 60 -­‐ 64 65+

Age

Source: VantagePOB

Figure 31 highlights that a larger number of offshore personnel work for contractors in every age group. This is particularlynoticeable inthe30to34agebracketwhere78.5percentofemployeeswithinthisagecategorywork for contractors.

8

Figure31: TheBreakdown inPersonnelWorking forOperatorsandContractors

3,500

Operator

Contractor

3,000

2,500

2,000

1,500

Number of Personnel

1,000

500

0

Under 18

18 - 23 24 - 29 30 - 34 35 - 39 40 - 44 45 - 49 50 - 54 55 - 59 60 - 64 65+

Age

Source: VantagePOB

page31

UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014

page32

UKCSOFFSHOREWORKFORCEDEMOGRAPHICSREPORT2014 OIL&GASUK

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ISBN1903004284 ©2014TheUKOil andGas IndustryAssociation Limited, tradingasOil&GasUK

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