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Wednesday, May 9, 2012 Volume 112 • Number 5 308 S. Main, PO Box 950 Freeman, SD 57029 www.freemansd.com

I NSIDE : Music contest Local grade school students sing, play in Freeman

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CHANGING OF THE GUARD

INSIDE - Agriculture.....................................................p. 5 Area News ......................................................p. 2 Church News ................................................p. 8 Classifieds.............................................p. 14, 15 Forum...............................................................p. 4 Home................................................................p. 6 Miscellanea....................................................p. 2 Obituaries.......................................................p. 2 Public Notice.......................................p. 12, 15 Reflections ..................................................p. 16 Sports ............................................................p. 10 Social.................................................................p. 7 16 pages The Freeman Citywide Rum- mage Sale will take place Saturday, June 9 beginning at 8:30 a.m. The Freeman Athletic Association is once again organizing the event. Information and registration sheets are available at Merchants State Bank. The registration deadline is Friday, June 1. For more informa- tion call Emily Hofer at 925-7223. Cornbelt track meetThursday Seven teams, including Freeman High School, are scheduled to take part in the 2012 Cornbelt Confer- ence Track Meet in Freeman this week Thursday, May 10. Field events begin at 1 p.m. with running events slated to start at 3 p.m. Other participating teams in- clude Bridgewater-Emery, Canis- tota, Hanson, Marion, McCrossan Boys Ranch (new to the Cornbelt Conference this year) and Menno. The meet will include varsity, junior varsity and junior high com- petition. The last event, the 1,600 relay, is scheduled to begin at 7:30 p.m. Freeman Academy was sched- uled to take part in the Tri Valley Conference Track Meet Tuesday, May 8. Both FA and FHS will take part in the Region 3B Track Meet in Centerville Thursday, May 17. The state meet will be held in Rapid City Friday and Saturday, May 25 and 26. FA, FHS to take part in regiongolf meet in Sioux Falls Golfers from Freeman Academy and Freeman High School will take part in the Region 3B Tournament in Sioux Falls next Monday, May 14. Elmwood will be the location for both the boys and girls. Other schools competing in Re- gion 3B are Alcester-Hudson, Bal- tic, Bridgewater-Emery, Canistota, Centerville, Garretson, Gayville- Volin, Irene-Wakonda, Marion, McCook Central-Montrose, Parker and Viborg-Hurley. Individuals placing in the top 20 will advance to the state tourna- ment. In addition, teams that finish first or second in the final standings may take an entire squad to state. The State ‘B’ Golf Tournament will be held in Rapid City Monday and Tuesday, May 21 and 22. The boys will compete at Hart Ranch while the girls will compete at the Elks. FHS competed in the pre-region meet at Central Valley in Hartford Monday, May 7. Results were not available in time for publication. Freeman Fishing Derby returning to arboretumJune 16 The eighth-annual Freeman Fishing Derby is scheduled to take place Saturday, June 18 at the Free- man Prairie Arboretum. Youth through age 15 are invited to participate; fishing gear will be available for those who do not have their own. Prizes will be awarded for fish caught in three age divisions. Watch the Courier in the weeks to come for more information. The Freeman Fishing Derby was started in 2005 by Chet Sorensen and Tom Stolp. Stolp continues to organize the event thanks to broad support from the business commu- nity. Citywide rummage planned June 9 Saturday Freeman native bringing trio of musicians back home ■ p 3 MCA A look at the life and death of an influencial musician ■ p 4 DonDiede Relays A look inside FHS’s biggest sports event of the spring ■ p 10 FHS hosting

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Return on investment Freeman Community Foundation honors local organizations, scholarship winners at banquet by Jeremy Waltner ith a city of Freeman ward map and the South Dakota state seal behind him, new Freeman Mayor Sam Sorensen is administered the oath of office by city attorney Dale Strasser Monday evening, May 7, the first meeting of a new year for local city govern- ment. Sorensen, who defeated Lonnie Tjaden in the incumbent’s bid for re-election last month, on Monday took his seat at the head of a table made up of old and new councilors alike; in addition to Randy Broders, Charles Gering, Scott Stern and CharlyWaltner, the new coun- cil includes Eva Olson and Donna Waltner, who replace Loren Tschetter and Royce Breneman. In his opening remarks to city officials, Sorensen called for hard work among elected officials and

spoke of a desire to come together for the good of the community. “We must remember, as city officials, we are in this together for the betterment of the city of Freeman. We must have conti- nuity as a council, have a healthy environment for the community and work together with each other for the common good of Freeman.” Sorensen’s first meeting included the eyes and ears of a notable audience member — his father, Chet, who 35 years ago took the oath of office as mayor of Freeman, a position he served for 12 years that became part of a 30-year career in local city government. For more on Sam Sorensen, his seat at the city table and the special connection he now shares with his father, see next weeks’ Courier . PHOTO BY JEREMY WALTNER

Big boost for the bus Thanks to unexpected funds from ROCS, transportation service set to begin in June by Jeremy Waltner “All good news.”

know about us much as I did four years ago. I think board member Ruth Strasser stated it best when she said, ‘I think the Freeman Community Foundation is really Freeman’s best kept secret.’” Future gifts to the FCF will help its endowment grow and benefit the community for years to come, Walter said. “One of our strategic goals as a board is to increase awareness of the wonderful and vital impact this foun- dation has made on the lives of the citizens of Freeman. Although there are many local organizations and charities that are extremely valuable and important to this commu- nity, the foundation differentiates itself in two significant ways.” The first, he said, is that the FCF has far-reaching im- pact. “There’s really no segment of the community that hasn’t benefited from the foundation,” he said. The second, Walter continued, is that the contributions made to the organization are long lasting. “Your resources make the Freeman community a better place to live for many generations to come.” Hofer recognized the board members who helped found the FCF in 1997 by name: Jackie Goosen, Stephen Rous- sos, Sharon Schamber, Dewayne Kieper, Brian Field, Lar- ry Horner, Glenn Roth and the late Pam Ortman. Roth, who has remained a board member every year since and will leave his post in 2012 because of term lim- its, was on hand at Thursday’s reception. Hofer addressed him directly. “Fifteen years ago, did you know the impact this foundation would have on the community?” she asked.

In what Emily Hofer referred to as “our highlight,” the Freeman Community Foundation (FCF) formally honored its most recent grant recipients and scholarship winners at a dessert reception at the Prairie Arboretum Interpretive Center Thursday evening, May 3. Hofer, secretary of the FCF, and Nathan Walter, FCF board president, both of- fered comments at last week’s gathering. And while the event was in recognition of those on the receiving end of the local community foun- dation, Hofer and Walter both spoke of the value of the organization now in its 15th year. “What a great idea for a foundation,” Walter said; “an endowment that will perpetually give back to the greater Freeman community.” Walter said one of the goals of FCF officials is to pro- mote the organization in an effort to strengthen its vis- ibility in the community, and admitted that when he was first approached to be on the board of directors four years ago by past president Jill Aanenson, his first question was, “What is the Freeman Community Foundation?” “How is it possible I had never heard of this nearly half- million dollar foundation that has had such a broad impact on Freeman?” Walter said, noting that 44 grants and five service scholarships totalling nearly $100,000 have been awarded since 2000. “We believe there’s room for us to make a larger impact in Freeman,” he continued. “Unfortunately, most people 2012 RECEPTION

handicap clients in southeastern and south central South Dakota. Freeman was not scheduled to be part of the budget in 2012, leaving those involved with the local ROCS project seeking other financial sup- port. “It’s not like we were not going to have bus service available, but this pushes us further ahead than we an- ticipated,” said Kaufman, president of Freeman Community Transit. “We’ll also be able to broaden the scope of the service we offer; that’s the big thing.” The ROCS funding, which comes on top of local financial support al- ready committed, “really opens up the possibilities,” he said. While details — including rider fees — have yet to be worked out, those expanded services could in- clude at least one additional hand- icap-accessible minivan to supple- continued on back page: Bus

That’s how Norm Kaufman de- scribes the latest developments in the Freeman community’s effort to establish a bus transportation ser- vice to assist residents with errands and appointments, from a trip to the grocery store to the doctor’s office. It appears that service should be available by the first week of June — ahead of the schedule beset by funding limitations. An advertisement for drivers be- gins running this week, just as the articles of incorporation for Free- man Community Transit have been submitted to the state for approval. All of this comes on the heels of last week’s surprising news that Freeman Community Transit would be included in 2012 funding through ROCS (Rural Office of Community Services), which provides assis- tance to low-income, elderly and

continued on back page: Foundation

Down in the valley A photo essay by JeremyWaltner Down in the valley, around a gentle bend in the road, was a store. Its simple stature was out-simplified only by its name, and its impact on the area was far deeper than even the valley in which it rested. The Turkey Ridge Store never had a town per se to call its own; rather, it was a heart among the charcoal veins of the land, con- necting the people of one community to the next. The final owner called it the “hub.” East and slightly north stands the community of Hurley, east and slightly south, Swan Lake. Spring Valley is straight south, Menno straight west, Marion straight north and Freeman to the northwest. You can add Irene and Viborg to the neighborhood, too. How many farmers and housewives, children and passersby in between stopped at the Turkey Ridge Store to eat a candy bar, drain a Mountain Dew, pick up a bag of feed, can of beans, jug of milk or gallon of gas? Not anymore. No, the Turkey Ridge Store of Turkey Ridge, nestled in the heart of the Turkey Ridge Valley on Highway 18, run by a family devoted to the community, is closed. The front door is locked. The American flag waving to cars and trucks screaming by has been taken down. Mind you, other enterprises owned and operated by Bruce and Becky Ebbesen — the last to own the Turkey Ridge Store — are still viable. Yep, Turkey Ridge Oil and Ridge Kitchen Lunchwagon are still going strong. But not the store. Its closing Saturday, April 28, marked the end of a colorful chapter in the history of the store that dates all the way back to 1927 and no doubt stirred up some kind of emo- tion in those who remember buying dried goods, drinks, hardware, tires, feed and seed there, or taking a seat at the restaurant-style booth in the corner, where, as Becky puts it

through the emotion of the day, “we solved the world’s problems.” The history is rich. The pictures document today. Turn to page 9.

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