September 29 eEdition

PRSRT STD ECRWSS U.S. POSTAGE PAID STAMFORD, CT PRSRT STD EC W S U.S. POSTAGE AID PALMER, MA PER IT NO. 22

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The Gre enwi ch Sent i ne l Founda t i on l SEPTEMBER 29 , 2017

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R i v e r s i d e

GPDMakes Arrest in GHS Lockdown Case A fter a nearly six month long investigation into the discovery of a threatening message written inside a Greenwich High School bathroom stall, the Greenwich Police Department announced early Wednesday morning that they've arrested a juvenile student for Threatening in the first degree and Breach of Peace in the second. On March 29, 2017, the threatening message was found inside a bathroom stall and was brought to the attention of the school, which subsequently went into a lockdown, freezing 3,000 people in place. Approximately 40 officers responded to the GHS campus and searched every student, backpack and room for weapons or other threats. All after-school activities were cancelled, except for the choral concert which proceeded as scheduled. The lockdown was lifted at 4 p.m., and students were dismissed after the building was deemed safe. At the time, the Greenwich Police Department said the lockdown was not due to a bomb threat, but that a specific time and location was referenced in the written message. Dr. Sal Corda, who was serving as the interim Superintendent when the incident took place, commended the students and police officers for handling the situation in an orderly and efficient manner. “Our procedures were implemented and students did an outstanding job in following the directions of the staff. The high school administration and the staff acted with a high level of professionalism and evidenced the strongest of concerns for student safety at every step of the process,” Corda said in a statement that day. “The Greenwich Police Department had an imposing presence, guided our actions at every step, and facilitated a smooth process where every room was thoroughly searched and every student was appropriately searched by a male or female member of the high school staff.” According to a press release released by the GPD on Wednesday, the Special Victim Section conducted the investigation and eventually identified a suspect. Probable cause for an arrest was established, and the department applied for a Juvenile Arrest Warrant which was reviewed by the Juvenile Prosecutor and presented to a Superior Court Judge who signed off on it. "The safety of our children — our most vulnerable population — is a paramount mission of the Greenwich Police Department," said GPD Det. Sgt. Brent Reeves in the press release. "When these types of incidents occur, the full weight of the Greenwich Police Departments is put behind the investigation." The incident on March 29, 2017 was the first of two threats made towards the high school during the last school year. The second occurred when an adult suspect attempted to frame a student relative at GHS by passing a threatening note to a student. The investigation into that matter also ended with an arrest. By Richard Kaufman

Wine, Food and Fun...

Our Neighborhoods DOWNTOWN S Sunday, Oct. 1, 12 to 3 p.m. Greenwich Hospital will hold its 19th annual "Teddy Bear Clinic" at the Greenwich Medical Building pa rk i ng lot on 49 Lake Ave., behind the hospital. Children are encouraged to bring a favorite stuffed animal or doll for an exam. The event is a great way for children to meet doctors, nurses and hospital staff to become acquainted with the friendly faces of medicine. The free event will take place rain or shine. S Thursday, Oct. 5, 9 a.m. Join the Breast Cancer Alliance for t heir "Go For Pink " event on Greenwich Ave., which will bring the local community together for a special day of shopping, dining and educational forums to raise awareness and funds towards eradicating breast cancer. For more information, go to bcagoforpink.org BYRAM S Tuesday, Oc t . 3, 6:30 to 9 p.m. Come to t he Greenwich Community Garden’s third annual "Big Tomato" fundraising event at the Mill Street Bar and Table. Guests will mix and mingle and enjoy exquisite food prepared by Chef Geoff Lazlo, along with wine and beer. The evening will include live music and a drawing to win a selection of items. For more information and tickets, visit greenwichcommunitygardens.org COS COB S Sunday, Oct. 1, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Come by the Cos Cob Fire Company for their annual open house. This is a great opportunity to learn more about what the station does, as well as how to volunteer in the community. Additionally there will be trucks to climb in, a smoke house to explore, and live demonstration. OLD GREENWICH S Thursday, Oct. 5, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The third annual "Health & Wellness Expo for Older Adults" will take place at the Eastern Greenwich Civic Center. The event will provide opportunities for older adults to enhance and maintain their health, view resources from sponsors and engage in invigorating programs. All adults 55 and older are encouraged to attend. For more information, contact the Greenwich Commission on Aging at 203-862- 6710. RIVERSIDE S Month of October. Greenwich EMS is “going pink” for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. A special t-shirt has been created and is being sold for $20. All proceeds will be donated to the Breast Cancer Center at Greenwich Hospital. Shirts can be purchased at the GEMS offices, 1111 E. Putnam Ave., or by calling 203-637-7505. GREENWICH S Mond ay, Oc t . 2 t h r ou g h Wednesday, Oct. 4, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Greenwich Public Schools has contracted with KG+D Architects to develop a comprehensive 15 year Facilities Master Plan to include an assessment of all school facilities and to plan for maintenance, replacement cycles, renovations, and nex t generat ion schools. Community forums on the matter will be held at Western, Central and Eastern Middle Schools. Visit greenwichschools.org/masterplan for more information.

The smell of amazing cuisine and beverages from local vendors had the Town of Greenwich alive and well this past weekend, as the Greenwich Wine + Food Festival, presented by Seredipity, took over Roger Sherman Baldwin Park. In addition to the food for guests to sample, celebrity chefs like Mario Batali, Scott Conant and Alex Guaraschelli delighted the crowd and musical guests Train and Big Head Todd and the Monsters entertained. (Paul Silverfarb photo) Celebrating the New Historical Site, Dynamic History of a House I magine raising over $6 million over tea or lunch, view community artist exhibits, or visit the state of the art Archives and Gallery spaces. By Anne W. Semmes

Throw in a little political persuasion with State Rep. Liv v y Floren and Governor Dannel Malloy and a $250,000 grant arrived to double the parking places for the Bush-Holley Historic Site campus. The Bush Holley House after all is Greenwich’s only National Historic Landmark. It takes talent, and those talented one s gat hered recent ly surely to celebrate at the Belle Haven Yacht Club at the Historical Society’s 86th annual meeting. Long-serving board chair, Davidde Stackbein, saluted her board members,

i n two yea rs to reimag i ne t he Greenwich Historica l Societ y’s campus, with the grand opening of that expanded campus only a year away (with $790,000 left to raise). All the while an additional half million more dollars was raised for their new endowment, and a new initiative — the Vanderbilt Society, their new Planned Giving program is off to a promising start. Se e how t hat new c ampu s on Strickland Road is fast taking shape with its three-tiered Toby’s Tavern, where inside an Artists Cafe will attract those historically and art-minded to gather

From left, Anna Marie Greco, Curator of Education at the Greenwich Historical Society, and The Green-Twachtman House panelists, Teresa Vega, Susan Larkin, Cheryl Henson and John Nelson. (Anne W. Semmes photo)

Scott Frantz and his wife Icy, and First Selectman Peter Tesei and his wife Jill. But the evening’s entertainment fell to four individuals there to share the history of a house they each hold

and executive director Debra Mecky praised their extraordinary “Reimagine Campaign” committee members headed by Peter Malkin. Serving as Honorary Chairs were Malkin’s son-in-law and daughter, Senator Richard Blumenthal and his wife Cynthia, and State Sen.

See HISTORY on Page 10

Carbon Monoxide Scare a Reminder to Be Vigilant A n incident in town two weeks ago is a reminder about the dangers of carbon monoxide and how quickly something that’s in with breathing apparatuses and brought the man out to get him treatment. He was sent to Norwalk Hospital for treatment in a hyperbaric chamber. The Greenwich police officer was treated locally as a precaution. While the investigation is ongoing, Greenwich By Paul R. Silverfarb See CARBON on Page 11

odorless and colorless needs to be taken seriously. Earlier this month, at around 1 p.m., a call came in to the Greenwich Police Department as a report of an unconscious male in an Old Kings Highway residence. According to GPD Lt. David Nemecek, upon entry to the residence, the police officer immediately recognized there was a problem with the air, left the residence and the Greenwich Fire Department was then called to the scene. Once the officer at the scene realized it was such a toxic environment and that he wouldn’t be able to pull the person out by himself without getting overcome by the fumes, the officer recognized where the unconscious man was located and went back in for the second time, despite having issues dealing with the air initially, opening windows and doors to ventilate the residence. "The officer did his best in toxic air to identify the victim, and tried to alleviate the poor air by opening windows, and was able to pass information on to be able to get that person out” Nemecek said. “He did a great job.” Members of the Greenwich Fire Department went

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The Greenwich Fire Department was busy during a call to Greenwich Ave. recently. (John Ferris Robben photo)

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