Stego Glove Sizing Guide and Glove Care Guide

STEGO ® GLOVEs TECHNOLOGIES

GLOVE SIZING GUIDE

IS GLOVE SIZE IMPORTANT?

Hand

Gloves

Glove Size

Palm Circumference

A proper fit is extremely important in choosing hand protection gloves. An uncomfortable fit causes hand fatigue, unproductive and may lead to a potential work-place hazard.

Length Minimum Length

6 7 8 9

152 178 203 229 254 279

160 170 182 192 204 215

220 230 240 250 260 270

10 11

HOW TO MEASURE?

Lay your dominant hand flat, fingers together, palm facing upwards. Wrap the measuring tape around your palm, just below the knuckles, not including the thumb. Length is measured from the bottom of the palm (where meet your wrist) to the top of the middle finger.

Measure the width of your palm at its widest point below knuckle.

6

S M L XL 2XL 7 8 9 10 11

Measure from the bottom of your palm (where meets your wrist) to the top of your middle nger.

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GLOVE CARE PPE's life span may shorten due to improper glove care. It can also lead to dermatitis, decreased dexterity, loss of protective abilities, and odor. Glove care refers not only to laundering, but also proper storage, routine glove checks, and knowledge of materials and their particular strengths and weaknesses. Because there are so many different work gloves on the market, experienced safety managers should be aware of what workers’ gloves are made of and how they will stand up to the applications they’re being used for. Common glove materials include nylon, spandex, leather, cotton, Kevlar®, and knit fibers. Each of these materials has a certain way it needs to be cared for, and oftentimes there is a blending of the materials, making proper care even more crucial. Proper Storage: Gloves should be ideally stored in clean, dry conditions, away from direct sunlight and extreme temperatures. Routine Glove Checks: Glove life varies based on application, environment, and amount of use. Because of this, it is vital that you perform routine glove checks, ideally before going to work every day. Take note of areas that may have begun to wear down, such as loose Velcro®, a worn-down nametag, lingering moisture, or a strong odor. Keeping an eye out for these issues and others keeps you one step further from a worksite hand injury, which is the ultimate goal of hand protection in the first place. Care and Content: Our C&C tag, which indicates washing instructions and fiber content, is located on the inside cuff of all our gloves or in all packaging. Gloves marked “wash with care” are machine washable. The number inside the symbol denotes what temperature to wash the gloves at (e.g., machine wash with care at 30 degrees Celsius). Washing with care can be done by changing the machine cycle, using a different pre-set wash program (gentle/delicate), and being sure not to overload the washing machine. When washing by hand it is important to use a soap and/or detergent that won’t irritate your skin. Also, be sure to wash gloves over a sink or outside, and rinse thoroughly. Companies who properly launder their gloves can increase lifespan by up to 300%. Laundering removes harmful chemicals, perspiration, and everyday grit and grime that can weaken protective fibers and seams. Stego® solutions specialist team is here to help you with this process, and they are more than happy to provide you with all the information you need. Machine wash cool Do not bleach Tumbledry low Line dry Do not iron

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EN ISO 374:2016 STANDARDS PROTECTIVE GLOVES AGAINST CHEMICALS AND MICRO-ORGANISMS.

UNDERSTANDING THE NEW EN ISO 374:2016 STANDARDS

The new EN ISO 374 standard refines the required capabilities for gloves that protect workers whose hands are subject to chemical and/or micro-organism exposure.

The standard EN 374 has several parts and the following are relevant for chemical protective gloves:

1. EN ISO 374-1:2016: Protective gloves against dangerous chemicals and micro-organisms —Part 1: Terminology and performance requirements for chemical risks

EN ISO 374:2016 • Gloves protecting from dangerous chemicals and micro-organisms. • Removal of reference to micro-organisms in the text. • Number of test chemicals increased 12 to 18. • Beaker no longer used. • Gloves classified as Type A, B or C. • Change of labelling on the product; pictogram of conical flask with differing number of the letters for test chemicals per type. NEW EN ISO 374:2003 • Gloves protecting from chemicals and micro-organisms. • Assumption of protection againsts micro-organisms. • 12” test chemicals. • Beaker for “ waterproof protective gloves with limited protection against chemcals. • Pictogram of conical flask with atleast 3 letters for test chemicals. OLD

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A B C D E F G H Increased the number of test chemicals, added 6 new to the list of hazardous compounds. Code letter Chemical Cas number Category NEW OLD Methanol Acetone 67-56-1 67-64-1 75-05-8 75-09-2 75-15-0 108-88-3 109-89-7 109-99-9 141-78-6 142-85-5 1310-73-2 7664-93-9 7697-37-2 Primary alcohol Ketone Acetonitrile Nitrile compound Chlorinated paraffin Dichloromethane Carbon disulfide Sulphur containing organic compound Toluen Aromatic hydrocarbon Diethylamine Amine Tetrahydrofuran Heterocyclic and ethereal compound I Ethyl acetate Ester J n-Heptan Saturated hydrocarbon K L Sodium hydroxide 40% Inorganic base Sulfuric acid 96% Nitric acid 65% Acetic acid 99% Ammonia 25% Inorganic mineral acid M N O Inorganic mineral acid, oxidising 64-19-7 Organic Acid Organic Base 1336-21-6 7722-84-1 7664-39-3 Hydrogen peroxide 30% Hydroflouric acid 40% Peroxide Inorganic mineral acid

P Q R

Formaldehyde 37%

50-00-0

Aldehyde

New Markings and the Glove Types

OLD

NEW

EN ISO 374-1:2016 TYPE C

EN ISO 374-1:2016 TYPE A

EN ISO 374-1:2016 TYPE B

EN 374:2003

EN 374:2003

J K L M N O

J K L

A K L

Type A Permeation

Type B Permeation

Type C Permeation

resistance of at least 30 minutes each for at least 6 test chemicals.

resistance of at least 30 minutes each for at least 3 test chemicals.

resistance of at least 10 minutes for at least 1 test chemical.

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2. EN 374-2:2014: Protective gloves against dangerous chemicals and micro-organisms — Part 2: Determination of resistance to penetration There are no significant changes.

3. EN 374-3:2003: Protective gloves against chemicals and micro-organisms – Part 3: Determination of resistance to permeation by chemicals

This standard has been removed and replaced by EN 16523-1:2015, Determination of material resistance to permeation by chemicals — Part 1: Permeation by liquid chemical under conditions of continuous contact, in the Official Journal after harmonisation. There is no significant effect on the test method.

4. EN 374-4:2013: Protective gloves against chemicals and micro-organisms — Part 4: Determination of resistance to degradation by chemicals

This part is new and takes into account the effect of degradation (change of glove material) by the chemical. Degradation can cause brittleness, swelling or shrinkage of the polymer material, for example. This is equivalent to a changing barrier function against the chemical.

This standard now creates a standardised measurement method for degradation for the first time.

5. EN ISO 374-5:2016: Protective gloves against dangerous chemicals and micro-organisms – Part 5: Terminology and performance requirements for micro-organisms risks

Gloves must pass the penetration resistance test in accordance with standard EN 374-2: 2014. The possibility of claiming protection against viruses was added, if the glove passes ISO 16604: 2004 (method B) test.

EN ISO 374-5

EN ISO 374-5:2016

For gloves offering protection against bacteria and fungi.

For gloves protecting against bacteria, fungi and viruses.

VIRUS

Users will only notice the application of the changes to EN 374 on the marking of the protective glove. From a user perspective, the standard is mainly used for product comparison and also offers security that the product has undergone standardized certification. Application consulting with the manufacturer is still very important. The specific requirements for protection must be identified as part of a risk assessment of the actual activities in the workplaces and must take the specific working conditions into account. The user or the responsible occupational safety experts should define the individual requirements and ask the manufacturer for the specific protective performance of the protective gloves.

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STEGO ® GLOVEs TECHNOLOGIES

Cut Tests Explained: EN 388 (CE)

What is the EN388? The EN388 is a compilation of 4 tests (abrasion, cut, tear, puncture) for determining the mechanical protection levels of PPE materials. It is most frequently used in European markets, but has been making its way into the United States as a widely accepted standard for measuring protective properties of industrial PPE.

EN 388

MARKING

PPE that use the EN388 method are marked with a CE label and 4 numbers corresponding to the scores received in each of the mechanical tests. Each test rates the material on a scale of 1 (low) to 4 (high), except in the case of the blade cut test with is on a 1 to 5 scale.

4 4 3 4

Rating

Abrasion 1 2 3 4 Cut (Coup Test) 1 2 3 4 5 Tear 1 2 3 4 Puncture 1 2 3 4

COUP TEST (EN 388) European Standards

HOW THE TEST WORKS A circular blade (think pizza cutter) moves back and forth across a material sample under a fixed load of 500 grams (5N), while rotating in the opposite direction of the linear motion of the mounting device. Results of this test are calculated by recording the number of blade revolutions needed to cut through the material, which is then compared to a Cut Index which gives the material a rating from 1 (low) to 5 (high).

Sample Material

Conductive strip to detect cut through

LIMITATIONS OF THE TEST There are many shortcomings of the EN388 for cut-resistance. One of the major issues with the cut-test method is that the test is not necessarily representative of the hazards that end-users are exposed to in industrial applications. • the fixed weight of 500g is very low (less than 1lb of force) • the blade itself is a smooth edged blade, where the hazards in real industrial applications can vary in size, shape, and angle • the blade is not changed during the test, which can skew results Ironically, this test, designed to measure cut resistance, is not suitable for materials that have a high degree of cut resistance as the materials that contribute to cut resistance (glass fibers, steel or hard guard plates) tend to dull the blade and overestimate the real world protection provided by such gloves. Moreover, EN 388 is not suitable for high cut resistance materials. High cut resistant materials dull the blade quickly by the numerous alternating movements required to cut the sample, thus results are overestimated.

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