Community Connections - Winter 2017

C OMMUNITY C ONNECTION

ISSUE 89 WINTER 2017

#SumTraffic Update - Progress onTraffic Avenue

Dear Olympia....

It may not feel like it on an “ordi- nary” Tuesday evening back-up, but progress is being made on funding to fix the Traffic Avenue/E Main bottleneck interchange with SR 410. Last year, the City of Sumner gathered $8 million in public-private funding, including $300,000 from the State legislature. Design work is underway, and a record number of participants stopped by the open house or took the online survey to help shape the design. Here are the highlights:

The State of Washington is facing an interesting session ahead, full of policy and funding decisions. Many of them will affect the City of Sumner. Here’s Sumner’s top priorities, approved by the City Council and sent to State legislators for a productive session ahead:

SR 410 Interchange Last year, the State provided $300,000 in funding to as- sist with design and planning for the SR 410 interchange at Sumner’s Traffic Avenue/Puyallup’s East Main St. We need another $10 million to complete this key project. Please allocate $5 million in State funding to leverage further grant dollars and build this key infrastructure as quickly as possible. Preserve City-State Partnership This past year has shown the importance of cities being able to invest in infrastructure for safe water, sewer and storm plus a well trained and prepared police department to respond to a variety of situations. Shared revenue is the part- nership with the State of Washington that makes these critical services possible, contributing over $1 million to Sumner’s budget. Continue to support critical life-safety services with shared revenues such as liquor tax, streamlined sales tax mitigation and firemen’s pension. Keep State Revenue Afloat Before Flooding Since it was diverted through Sumner in 1906, the White River has been filling up with gravel, significantly cutting down its ability to handle any kind of high flow released from Mud Mountain Dam. Critical roads, trails, residential and industrial facilities are in danger of being evacuated routinely this winter. The industrial alone is valued at $1 billion in property value, 17% of which goes to the State in property taxes. Support Sumner in getting assistance from County and Federal agencies in preventing and managing flood conditions. Help Cities Be More Transparent The Public Records Act is so old compared to technology that it actually poses a challenge to cities using new technology to increase their transparency, a direct contrast to the law’s original intent. The law needs to be updated to help cities be more transparent, using tools such as social media, websites and email without being in conflict with outdated laws. Update the Public Records Act to make it once again encourage transparency.

Engineers studied everything from replacing the existing overpass to using round-abouts. Since the existing bridge is structurally sound, the most effective and quickest option is to build a second bridge alongside with two more lanes and pedestrian access. Although roundabouts move light traffic more efficiently and reduce fatality accidents, this inter- change moves too much high-volume traffic and freight to make them feasible. Plus, pedes- trians prefer an actual crossing signal on such busy intersections.

Bienvenido a Sumner Thanks to a new (and free!) plugin forWord- Press, you can now browse Sumner’s website in multiple languages, from Spanish to Japanese. Use the box on the left-side toolbar to select the language of your choice at www.sumnerwa.gov

ADA Crosswalks Installed to Improve AccessibilityThrough Sumner

Did you notice new curb-cuts and ramps installed on intersections throughout the older downtown area? This is the first project completed under Sumner’s new ADA Transition Plan to help make all of Sumner accessible. You can review the full plan on- line at www.sumnerwa.gov. In the meantime, enjoy the newly accessible routes.

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