Another Trip Down Memory Lane (Rodeo Drive)

way around. Their three-fold mission is service, service, and service—in doing whatever is necessary to protect and guide a client’s best interests—by practicing posterity, not prosperity. This necessarily means that a quality dealer is relationship-driven rather than transaction-driven—a totally different business model. They are known not only for the good deals they make, but also for the dubious deals they do not make. They do this by thinking and negotiating on behalf of their clients’ interests first and foremost—the goal is to place the proper artworks in the correct collections, not to just make a sale. Finally, it is of paramount importance to educate clients. True partnerships and relationships between a dealer and collectors are built on the dealer’s dedication and ability to understand the “ins and outs” of the art world and then to share that knowledge, expertise and acumen openly and transparently with the clients. By educating clients at the highest level—with all aspects of the process focusing on building museum-quality collections, great collectors are enriched in their ongoing understanding and expertise. Ultimately this translates to a single word—vision. Collectors can develop their vision by combining their knowledge with their experience into understanding. Clarity of understanding allows a person to not only gaze into the past, but to see the future—to see the art trends shaping a continually developing world. In that regard, I want to share an incredible story of a conversation centuries ago between an artist and a simple worker in a marble yard in Carrara, Italy. “Cut that massive piece of marble there my good fellow” the young artist demanded. “But sir, what in the world would and could you possibly do with a piece of marble of such enormity?” “Young man, question not my decision” the artist gazed toward the stone,” I already see the image of a great figure—it’s there, if you look yourself. It’s there—waiting for me to liberate it and bring it to form.” His passionate gaze for the marble intensified as he asked, “Can’t you see the masterpiece just waiting to be brought to life by my hands and chisels?” In that regard, I want to share an incredible story of a conversation centuries ago between an artist and a simple worker in a marble yard in Carrara, Italy. “Cut that massive piec of marble th re my good fellow” the young artist Carrara marble quarry, Italy toward the stone,” I already see the image of a great figure—it’s there, if you look yourself. It’s there—waiting for me to liberate it and bring it to form.” His passionate gaze for the marble intensified as he asked, “Can’t you see the masterpiece just waiting to be brought to life by my hands and chisels?” demanded. “But sir, what in the world would and could you possibly do with a piece of marble of such enormity?” “Young man, question not my decision” the artist gazed

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