A Course for Safe Boating
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64

California Boating 

A Course for Safe Boating

Chapter 3

u

Vessel Operation

Emergency Anchoring

Use of an anchor can help in emergency situations.

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If the boat engine fails, set the anchor immediately to avoid running

aground.

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If drifting into shallow waters or other boats, set the anchor.

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If bad weather, rough waters or currents are blowing you ashore, set

the anchor.

Weighing Anchor

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Head the boat toward the anchor.

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Go ahead slowly using the engine while you retrieve the line.

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When the boat is over the anchor, stop the boat—but not the engine—and

lift the anchor.

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Carefully stow the anchor and line so it will be ready for the next use.

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Never

pull up the anchor without starting the engine first.

If the anchor does not come free, try the following in calm water, avoiding

wave action from your vessel’s stern:

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Tie the anchor line to a cleat and go forward slowly.

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If the anchor still does not come free, circle slowly and try to loosen the

anchor. Be careful to keep the line from wrapping around the propeller.

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Try to free the anchor from several different angles—and don’t give up

easily. The chain or the anchor may be hung up. Don’t put the boat or pas-

sengers in danger.

Common Mistakes

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Letting the anchor go without securing the line to the boat

—oops, lost the

anchor!

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Letting the anchor go with the anchor line wrapped around gear or the foot

of a passenger

—oops, lost the passenger or the gear!

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Poor communication between the boat operator and the person setting the

anchor

—oops, dropped the anchor at the wrong time!