Parks, Trails & Recreation Master Plan

2019-11-06

& RECREATION MASTER PLAN CITY OF SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS

CONTENTS HAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESS7 THE ROLE OF PARKS AND RECREATION 8 INTRODUCTION + DOCUMENT PURPOSE 10 RELATED DOCUMENTS 17 HISTORY 23 PARALLEL PROCESSES 27 MASTER PLAN PROCESS 28 CHAPTER 2: NEEDS ASSESSMENT 31 DEMOGRAPHICS ANALYSIS 33 TRENDS ANALYSIS 42 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT 57 CLASSIFICATION + LEVEL OF SERVICE STANDARDS 85 BENCHMARK ANALYSIS 88 RECREATION PROGRAM ASSESSMENT 90 CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM VISION 95 VISION + MISSION 96 THEMES + ACTIONS 97 TRAILS + CONNECTIONS 105 PARK CLASSIFICATIONS + DEVELOPMENT 118

CHAPTER 4: PARK + TRAIL PLANNING

161

170

THE RIVERFRONT

198

MEMORIAL PARK + THE LANDING

210

LIONS PARK

214

QUARRY LAKE PARK

220

VIERLING GREENWAY

230

WINDERMERE PARKS

CHAPTER 5: IMPLEMENTATION

247

249

USING THIS DOCUMENT

257

FUNDING + REVENUE STRATEGIES

263

MAINTENANCE + OPERATIONS OVERVIEW

APPENDICES APPENDIX A: OPERATIONAL ASSESSMENT APPENDIX B: FINANCIAL ASSESSMENT APPENDIX C: PROGRAM ASSESSMENT APPENDIX D: BENCHMARK ANALYSIS

3

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS CITY COUNCIL MAYOR BILL MARS COUNCIL MEMBER JODY BRENNAN COUNCIL MEMBER ANGELICA CONTRERAS CONSULTANT TEAM CONFLUENCE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PROS CONSULTING PUTTING CHANGE IN MOTION

COUNCIL MEMBER MATT LEHMAN COUNCIL MEMBER JAY WHITING

COMMUNITY PARTICIPANTS HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE WITHIN THE SHAKOPEE COMMUNITY GRACIOUSLY OFFERED THEIR TIME TO PROVIDE INSIGHT, THOUGHTS, AND IDEAS THROUGHOUT THE PLANNING PROCESS. THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS WERE IMPERATIVE TO THE CREATION OF THIS PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN.

CITY STAFF MICHAEL KERSKI, DIRECTOR OF PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT JAY TOBIN, DIRECTOR OF PARKS AND RECREATION WILLIAM REYNOLDS, CITY ADMINISTRATOR STEVE LILLEHAUG, PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR/CITY ENGINEER NATE BURKETT, ASSISTANT CITY ADMINISTRATOR JOE WIDING, SENIOR PLANNER SHERRY DVORAK, PROGRAMMING AND SERVICES MANAGER KYLE SOBOTA, SENIOR PLANNER JENN BREWINGTON, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST BILL EGAN, PUBLIC WORKS SUPERINTENDENT

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN 4

PLANNING COMMISSION KENT ROBBINS, CHAIR ASHLEE SEPULVADO, VICE CHAIR NOREEN REDING, MEMBER DANIEL MOCK, MEMBER

PARKS AND TRAILS STEERING COMMITTEE BRAD MCGARR

MATT LEHMAN, COUNCIL MEMBER JODY BRENNAN, COUNCIL MEMBER JOHN OTTO JEREMY CASPER ASHLEE SEPULVADO BILLY WERMERSKIRCHEN SCOTT O’BRIEN LAURA BJOKLUND ALICIA WATTS LEAH DUSSOLD MICHELLE ENDERSON TIM ZUNKER

JOSH FORSYTHE, MEMBER DANIEL OLSON, MEMBER LORI HOGAN, MEMBER

PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY BOARD JEREMY CASPER, MEMBER

KYLE VERLEY, MEMBER MIKE VOGEL, MEMBER JOHN ENGLER, MEMBER JOHN JANKE, MEMBER JOHN OTTO, MEMBER JOSEPH YETMAN, MEMBER

SHERRY DVORAK, PROGRAMMING AND SERVICES MANAGER STEVE LILLEHAUG, PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR/CITY ENGINEER MICHAEL KERSKI, DIRECTOR OF PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

5

This page was intentionally left blank

6 SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESS

SECTION CONTENTS:

» » PURPOSE OF PARKS » » INTRODUCTION + DOCUMENT PURPOSE » » RELATED DOCUMENTS » » HISTORY

» » PARALLEL PROCESSES » » MASTER PLAN PROCESS

7

THE ROLE OF PARKS AND RECREATION The importance of parks, trails, and open space is consistently reinforced by new studies, analyses, and public surveys both nationally and within Minnesota. There is a recognition that parks and recreation can provide essential services to communities including: » » economic value » » health and environmental benefits and » » social importance

trails, and natural areas as the most important feature of attractiveness in a community, at a 5-to1 ratio, to the next most attractive feature (Metropolitan Council, 2010b). Parks are economically important drivers of indirect revenues to the local economy through tournaments and special events, tourism, recreation equipment sales, food and beverage sales, and many other private sector business connections. Revenues are often generated directly from fees and other charges to help support parks and recreation development and operations, making the investment into parks and recreation a sound economic decision. Shakopee has a few regional destination private recreation centers such as Valley Fair and Canterbury Park, and have hosted large sporting events in the past, such as the MN Bike Ironman and the State Amateur Baseball Tournament, that have brought significant crowds to the city from outside areas. Outdoor recreation opportunities can potentially be a health care savings approach for communities. In 2000, medical costs in Minnesota associated with physical inactivity were estimated to be $495 million (Minnesota Department of Health, 2002). Recreation opportunities have been shown to decrease these expenses. For example, a 1.0 percent increase in trail or off-trail related activity is associated with a 0.07 percent decrease in overweight population (Rosenberger, Bergerson & Kline, 2009). Further, just one additional day of physical activity per week has been found to reduce medical charges by 4.7% (Pronk, Goodman, O’Connor & Martinson,1999).

Parks and open spaces provide critical ecosystem services to the community that tangibly improve air and water quality, reduce flooding impacts, preserve biodiversity and wildlife, and buffer communities from the effects of climate change. They also provide numerous economic and quality of life benefits for the community. Parks improve the local tax base by increasing surrounding property values of private parcels. National studies have shown that real estate markets demonstrate that buyers are consistently willing to pay more for property located closer to parks, trails and open spaces (Anton, 2005; Crompton, 2007b). This was echoed by local developers in Stakeholder Interviews. Businesses are often drawn to communities with a higher quality of life (developed by parks and recreation) to attract and maintain educated workers (Crompton, 2007a). Twin Cities metropolitan residents consistently identify parks,

8 SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

Parks are a significant contributor to a city’s sense of place, identity, and community building through socialization and cultural exchange. Parks are a major provider of spaces and programs that allow residents to gather, socialize and be around their neighbors. Residents consistently cite parks, trails and the natural environment as the area’s most attractive features, and 96 percent of residents also feel that the Twin Cities is a better or much better place to live than other metropolitan areas (Metropolitan Council, 2010a). Strong feelings about a park or trail help develop a sense of place and the building of social capital. Communities with high amounts of social capital tend to be more connected, more trusting of one another, and have a greater number of networks and groups that exist to enhance the quality of life for their city (Putnam, 2000). The role of parks, trails, and open spaces in Shakopee continues to be redefined, but it has always had a large impact on the community’s identity and appeal to residents. Several of the stakeholders interviewed mentioned that the parks, trails, and open space system were one of the leading reasons for their family’s decision to move to Shakopee. High quality parks and recreation are reflective of the type of community that supports them and have been a critical part of Shakopee’s identity throughout the city’s history.

THEWILSON ROSE GARDEN AT THE MINNESOTA LANDSCAPE ARBORETUM PROVIDES A NATURAL LANDSCAPE OF RESPITE AND CONTRIBUTES TOTHE IDENTITY OF THE PLACE.

SECTION REFERENCES

ANTON, P. (2005). THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF OPEN SPACE: IMPLICATIONS FOR LAND USE DECISIONS. SAINT PAUL, MN: WILDER RESEARCH.

CROMPTON, J. (2007A).THE IMPACTOF PARKSANDOPENSPACESONPROPERTYTAXES. INT. F. DE BRUN (ED.),THE ECONOMICBENEFITSOF LANDCONSERVATION. SANFRANCISCO, CA:THETRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND.

CROMPTON, J. (2007B). COMPETITIVENESS: PARKS ANDOPEN SPACE AS FACTORS SHAPINGA LOCATION’S SUCCESS INATTRACTINGCOMPANIES, LABOR SUPPLIES, ANDRETIREES. INT. F. DE BRUN (ED.),THE ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF LAND CONSERVATION (PP. 48-54). SAN FRANCISCO, CA: THE TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND.

METROPOLITAN COUNCIL (2010B). 2009 METRO RESIDENTS SURVEY. SAINT PAUL, MN: METROPOLITAN COUNCIL.

MINNESOTADEPARTMENTOF HEALTH (2002). HEALTHCARE COSTSOF PHYSICAL INACTIVITY INMINNESOTA. RETRIEVEDONMARCH24,2010 FROMHTTP://WWW.HEALTH.STATE.MN.US/NEWS/PRESSREL/ INACTIVITYFS.PDF.

PRONK,N.,GOODMAN,M.,O’CONNOR,P.,&MARTINSON,B.(1999).RELATIONSHIPBETWEENMODIFIABLEHEALTHRISKSANDSHORT-TERMHEALTHCARECHARGES.THE JOURNALOFTHEAMERICANMEDICAL ASSOCIATION 282(23): 2235-2239.

PUTNAM, R.D. (2000). BOWLING ALONE: THE COLLAPSE AND REVIVAL OF AMERICAN COMMUNITY. NEW YORK, NY: SIMON & SCHUSTER.

9

1

Introduction + Planning Process

INTRODUCTION + DOCUMENT PURPOSE Sited on the bank of the Minnesota River, the City of Shakopee is rich in cultural history, physical resources, and a booming population of active and involved citizens who care deeply about their home. City leaders have curated over time a place that is diverse in entertainment and cultural offerings, strong private sector investments, ample public green spaces, and a vision for the city’s future while staying rooted in its enthralling history. From historically robust Native American settlements in this area to today’s sprawling development, the Shakopee area has been special to its inhabitants for all of its history.

embrace this natural resource both physically and emotionally has never been greater. The city is rapidly growing, and its demographics are shifting along with this growth. Shakopee is larger, more diverse, and more connected to the metropolitan region than it ever has been in the past. Historically, Shakopee has provided innovative parks and set aside natural landscapes to meet the needs of its residents. This document is intended to provide a new vision for Shakopee’s parks that will help the city meet the needs of its changing resident make-up, and face the challenges of the modern world where people have more choices than ever about where to locate their home or business. The Parks, Trails, and Recreation Master Plan will provide a comprehensive vision and framework for staff and elected officials to use to plan, build, communicate, and strategize about how parks can help Shakopee become the community its citizens continue to desire.

As the Twin Cities metropolitan area continues to expand, Shakopee remains a stand out resource in the area for entertainment offerings, cultural offerings, and as an imperative point in connectivity for regional recreational routes. The benefit of preserving natural amenities and providing access to these amenities has proven to improve quality of life for those who are able to access the natural environment even on a semi- regular basis. Through careful city planning and early visioning, Shakopee has been able to provide for its residents a vast array of parks and green spaces, and has the opportunity now to plan for the next generation of what these parks and connections will look like for years to come. One of the greatest physical resources in the city is the Minnesota River and the adjacent green spaces along this great river valley. With a downtown born from and still oriented along the Minnesota River, opportunity to re-

10

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

SPECIFICALLY, THIS DOCUMENT IS INTENDED TO:

» » Set expectations for the future improvements and expansions of the parks, recreation, and trail systems within Shakopee.

This Parks, Trails, and Recreation Master Plan is intended to be a sister document to the City’s 2040 Comprehensive Plan, Envision Shakopee. The purpose of this Master Plan is to guide the future planning efforts of public park spaces and trails within the City of Shakopee. This document comes at a time when the City of Shakopee is experiencing a tremendous expansion in residential, commercial, industrial, and mixed use developments, as well as great growth in the city’s population density and diversity. The City finds itself at a critical moment where it must ensure that the visioning and planning for the future of the parks, trails, and recreation system takes into account this growing and changing populous and the evolving trends in recreation that people want to participate in. As new residential developments are being planned out, established neighborhoods look for improvements and replacements of existing open spaces. New connections are being made to neighboring communities and it is important that the City takes a step to consider the framework laid out in this document to ensure a cohesion between any prospective project and the overall goals and plans identified in this document.

» » Provide guidance on prioritizing planned improvements.

» » Set a framework for projects moving forward, including collaboration and partnerships with certain groups that would be able to provide unique perspective and insight.

11

1

This document is composed of five parts that together form a cohesive vision for a robust parks system that serves the people, is responsive to changes in recreational trends, is flexible to expanding to meet a growing metropolitan region, yet retains its unique character that continues to tell the story of the City of Shakopee and what makes this place so special:

Introduction + Planning Process

1

INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESS

This chapter lays the groundwork for the purpose and intent of this document, and where the document fits into the relevant context of other planning processes or previously completed documents. The history of the City is explored to provide background on historical references.

2

NEEDS ASSESSMENT

In the data driven needs assessment chapter, the overall City demographics are analyzed, recreation trends are identified, the community engagement process is discussed and analyzed, and the overall state of the parks and recreation system is analyzed.

3

SYSTEM VISION

Through the master plan process involving conversations with stakeholders and the public, as well as analyzing national and regional trends and data, a vision is presented for the parks, trails, and recreation system of Shakopee moving forward.

4

PARK + TRAIL PLANNING

Chapter 4 lays out the park and trail system, then dives deeper into select parks that have been identified as candidates for taking a look at updating their layout and facilities. Concept plans for these select parks including parks along the riverfront and a large new development are detailed in this chapter.

5

IMPLEMENTATION

Looking forward to how all of the information and recommendations in this book are implemented, chapter 5 outlines a timeframe and budgetary framework for improvements.

12

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

THEMES

While all elements of the Master Plan are related and interconnected, the following Vision elements develop the priorities and guiding principles for Shakopee’s Parks, Trails, and Recreation for the next 20 years. The Vision elements are supported by actions, the Capital Improvements Plan, Operations and Maintenance Recommendations, and other strategies and recommendations found throughout this plan.

RIVERFRONT CONNECTION The riverfront is Shakopee’s signature feature. Maximize access to the river’s banks and waters and make the river part of the historic downtown’s experience. Rediscover the river and the community’s intricately shared history.

PUBLIC/ PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS The City’s strong business climate should be leveraged to develop new models of financial partnerships in the parks that will strengthen financial stability. Team with agencies, non-profits, and user groups to initiate innovative infrastructure and programming.

13

1

NEW/INNOVATIVE FACILITIES Transform the park and recreation system to meet existing and new trends, changing demographics, and opportunities for regional attractions where feasible. Build upon Shakopee’s history of innovation by identifying trends and opportunities.

Introduction + Planning Process

PREMIUM ATHLETICS Shakopee’s high quality facilities are able to support extensive league use and tournament hosting. This important tradition should be protected, enhanced, and strategically improved to continue meeting the needs of residents.

NATURAL AREAS Natural Areas should be restored in the parks and trails to connect residents to the natural world and provide ecosystem services that will make the city’s parks more resilient. Shakopee’s historic integration with the environment, specifically the Minnesota River Valley, should be preserved, restored, and celebrated to educate residents and visitors.

14

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

TRAILS AND CONNECTIONS Trails and sidewalks should be attractive routes that safely connect parks and key city destinations.

PARK ACCESSIBILITY AND PROGRAMMING

Park infrastructure and programming will support the Parks and Recreation mission of meeting the needs of all Shakopee residents, including populations who do not participate engaged in public engagement or parks and recreation programming.

15

SHAKOPEE PARKS OVERVIEW MAP

1 ´

MINNESOTA RIVER VALLEY

24

23

26

CR 101

BLUE LAKE

CR 101

VALLEYFAIR

31

Introduction + Planning Process

29

FISHER LAKE

1ST AVE E

4TH AVE E

DOWNTOWN

12

10

9

CANTERBURY RD

34

CR 101

ADAMS ST

13

17

EAGLE CREEK BLVD

25 TOWNLINE AVE SPENCER ST 11 39

CANTERBURY PARK

10TH AVE E

30

14

MINNESOTA RIVER VALLEY

HWY 13

40

32

HWY 169

38

1

16

HWY 169

5

4

CR 41 / CHESTNUT BLVD

27

15

41

DEAN’S LAKE

21

EAGLE CREEK BLVD

CR 21

17TH AVE W

36

3

CR 18

28

6

MYSTIC LAKE DR

HWY 169

37

35

7

MARSCHALL RD

19

42

2

8

W CR 78

20

43

22

OLD BRICK YARD RD

MARYSTOWN RD

18

33

O’DOWD LAKE

MINNESOTA RIVER VALLEY

W 150TH ST

MYSTIC LAKE CASINO HOTEL

34 Quarry Lake Park 35 Riverside Fields 36 Ridge Creek Park 37 Shutrop Park 38 Tahpah Park / Joe Schleper Stadium

23 Archery Range 24 Boat Launch 25 Vierling Greenway (Drainage Way Trail) 26 Riverfront Cultural Trail 27 17th Avenue Sports Complex 28 Green Meadows Park

12 Prairie Bend Park 13 Riverview Park 14 Scenic Heights Park 15 Hamlet Park 16 Savanna Oaks Park 17 Stans Park 18 Timber Trails Park 19 Autumn Hill Park 20 Whispering Oaks Park

1 Emerald Lane Tot Lot 2 Pheasant Run Tot Lot 3 Langdon Terrace Park

4 Royalty Park 5 Hackney Park 6 Saddle Ridge Park 7 Glacier Park 8 Cloverleaf Park 9 Hiawatha-Wermerskirchen 10 Huber Park 11 Meadows Park 1 2 0. 5 M i l es

0

39 Westminster Park 40 Southbridge Park 41 Windermere Parks

29 Huber Park 30 Lions Park 31 Memorial Park

42 Jackson Township Park (fut. annex) 43 Shakopee Schools Athletic Center

32 Muenchow Fields 33 O’Dowd Lake Park

21 Stagecoach Park 22 Prairie Meadows

16

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

RELATED DOCUMENTS

ENVISION SHAKOPEE 2040 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Envision Shakopee is the comprehensive planning and visioning tool for the City to use as it makes decisions regarding future development and livability in the City of Shakopee. The City has grown rapidly and greatly recently, and this planning document serves as guidelines to ensure physical, social, and economic development is in line with priorities identified by the community, supported by a team of professional consultants and committees. Among the development priorities identified in Envision Shakopee, the community has recognized the need for additional park and trail connections and more places for gathering. The comprehensive plan further elaborates on big ideas for Shakopee, many of which are dependent on strong green connections and spaces for people to move and gather. A vision for the riverfront is illustrated as highly developed and programmed, allowing residents and visitors to rediscover the river as an activated gateway to the City and downtown. Trail greenways connecting people to the community and neighborhood parks across the city, across major roads, major employment centers, and new developments are embedded in multiple planning sections. Overall, Envision Shakopee has a strong emphasis on connections and green space for the City, with these themes threading through all sections of the plan.

TOP: POTENTIAL VISION FOR HWY 101 CORRIDOR, COURTESY OF ENVISION SHAKOPEE. BOTTOM:POTENTIALVISIONFORRIVERFRONT,COURTESYOFENVISION SHAKOPEE.

17

1

Introduction + Planning Process

SHAKOPEE NATURAL RESOURCES PLAN The Shakopee Natural Resources Plan developed by the City of Shakopee in 2008, identifies important natural resources for the city including: the Minnesota River, adjacent floodplain forests, and bluffs. These resources provide ecological benefits (stormwater management, flood control, etc.), as well as economic benefits to the community (increased property value, community identity, etc.). The plan states

The 2005 “City of Shakopee Natural Resources Prioritization Matrix” is included as an appendix to the plan and categorizes the natural features on a “Good, Better, Best” rating system. A Natural Resource Corridor Map is included in the plan and identifies corridor connections. Furthermore, an addendum to this Natural Resources Plan, known as the “Natural Resources Inventory” (NRI) was completed in September of 2002 and follows the Minnesota Land Cover Classification System. However, this inventory has not been updated in nearly 17 years. The plan identifies some goals and strategies for the protection of the city’s natural resources. Primary goals of the plan are to preserve and improve the quality of the region’s environmental resources including water, wetlands, woodlands, non-woody upland vegetation, wildlife, and unique or endangered plants and animals. The plan also identifies the protection of steep slopes in the bluff regions for the preservation of Shakopee’s identity. In addition to these preservation efforts, opportunities for recreation within the city’s natural areas should still be created. Collaboration with adjacent governing bodies to strengthen connections and develop a natural resources corridor system is one element to help strengthen these natural resources.

that economic development in Shakopee has negatively impacted the environmental resources of the region through habitat fragmentation, removal of woodlands, degraded wetlands, and water and air pollution. The plan calls for the protection of these environmental resources but does not provide guidelines or a plan for implementation.

18

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

SCOTT WEST REGIONAL TRAIL MASTER PLAN This document is a comprehensive master plan for the Scott West Regional Trail. Currently 8-miles of a proposed 16.4-mile-long Scott West Regional Trail exist. The trail is significant because it links together several regional parks and connects the City of Shakopee to the surrounding communities of Lakeville, Prior Lake, Chanhassen, and Credit River Township. Importantly, this trail also runs

SCOTT COUNTY RURAL REGIONAL TRAIL DEVELOPMENT

AND DESIGN GUIDELINES

This document provides guidelines on rural and regional trail design for Scott County. Any trail development in the region should consult the guidelines to assist in the development of a cohesive regional trail network. These guidelines are not meant to be taken as strict standards, but rather may be

adapted to meet the constraints of each site. These guidelines aim to maximize the user experience while preserving and protecting the natural resources in the surrounding areas.

directly through the historic district of Shakopee along a one-mile bike boulevard and utilizes the historic pedestrian and bicycle bridge adjacent to Huber Park as a connection across the Minnesota River. The existing sections of the trail run through some of the most populated parts of the county, and an estimated 50% of the county’s population lives within the service area of the Scott West Regional Trail. With the population of Scott County expected to continue to grow, the plan recommends filling in gaps at high-priority trail connection areas. The proposed route would connect with the Minnesota Valley State Trail along the Minnesota River. The trail will also connect important community resources in Shakopee, including Downtown, three schools, and local government buildings.

19

1

SCOTT COUNTY 2040 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The newly adopted 2040 Scott County Comprehensive Plan sets out goals and strategies to guide the growth of Scott County. Since Scott County is part of the seven-county metro area, the county’s park system falls within the Metropolitan Council’s Regional Parks Policy Plan. The 2040 Parks and Trails Plan is structured around seven themes: The System, People and Services,

COMMUNITY LIVABILITY REPORT 2019 DRAFT

Introduction + Planning Process

Every few years, the City of Shakopee conducts a community-wide survey to gather residents’ opinions about the quality of life in Shakopee. The survey is conducted by the National Citizen Survey and received over 800 responses in 2019. Important conclusions from the survey include: 1. Shakopee continues to be a great place to live, with Safety as an important feature that contributes to quality of life. 2. Residents are pleased with Mobility but public transportation may be an area of focus for the City.

3. The Economy is a priority and residents support efforts toward redevelopment.

Relationships and Partners, Funding, Operations and Maintenance, Sustainability, and Natural Resources. Broadly speaking, the plan emphasizes the creation of a strong regional park and trail network and supports the development and protection of existing parklands and aims to acquire additional land for the development of more parkland, while offering a variety of experiences for park visitors. It is also important to preserve and maintain available natural and cultural resources as well as the ecological integrity of the region, while being a leader in sustainable management practices. Included in the 2040 Comprehensive Plan are maps that graphically depict the existing and proposed park and trail system for Scott County. This information is necessary for thinking about potentially trail connections between the City of Shakopee and the broader region. In particular, three proposed regional search corridors could impact on the city of Shakopee: Louisville Regional Trail Search Corridor, Minnesota River Extension Regional Trail Search Corridor, and the Prior Lake Outlet Regional Search Corridor.

HOMETOWN MESSENGER

Messenger Hometown

PARKSANDRECREATION

APublicationof theCityofShakopee |Summer2019

This quarterly publication created by the City of Shakopee is used to convey events and information to citizens.

Residentialowner apps,camerashelp policesolvecrimes Tech solutions

Survey resultsgive citynewgoals Behind the numbers

TheBuzzonBees City welcomes urban beekeeping

20

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

ONGOING AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS To meet the housing demand from a rising population, there are a number of residential development projects occurring within the city. Ridge Creek is a low-density residential development located in the eastern half of the city. It is composed of 104 single-family lots and has connections to regional trails due to its proximity to Southbridge Community Park. The out-lots of the development will be turned into a passive park, incorporating the existing wetlands. River Bluff Development is 125-unit plus apartment development located on the west side of downtown Shakopee. With its proximity to the riverfront, this project will be connected to the trail network along the river. Sarazin Flats is a multi-family residential development in central Shakopee near the intersection of U.S. Highway 169 and Marschall Road. It will be comprised of 105 multi-family residential units. Stagecoach at Southbridge is a new low-density development that is converting a former horse stable into 59 new single-family homes. This development is located on the eastern side of the City of Shakopee and will also include the development of a new park. In the Southbridge Neighborhood, there are also proposed plans to develop a memory care and assisted living facility, comprised of 16 memory care units and 20 assisted living units. Windermere is a project in the southwest region of Shakopee. Once completed, it will include 585 residential units, comprised of a combination of single-family homes, townhomes, senior apartments, and retail. West Shakopee Gateway is a 30-acre development project at the intersection of U.S. Highway 169 and County Highway 69. The project will include commercial and residential development. As Shakopee continues to grow, the city is looking into land use possibilities in western Shakopee. This West End Land Use Master Planning will be integrated into the 2040 Comprehensive Plan.

The former location of Shakopee City Hall (129 Holmes Street South) plans to be redeveloped into a mixed-use building with 89 apartment units, two levels of parking, and commercial space along Holmes Street. The site is located in downtown Shakopee and will be able to access some of the regional trails. This project will be breaking ground in July 2019. Canterbury Commons is a mixed-use development project that could include 856 residential units, 93,000 square feet of retail and entertainment commercial space, and a 120-room hotel. The development will be phased, beginning with the construction of a 313-unit apartment complex and club house. The Prairie Meadows development will be comprised of 52 single- family units. The subdivision will also include the creation of a 0.8-acre neighborhood park. There have also been improvements in Shakopee’s downtown region and investments have been made towards city beautification efforts.

21 Shakopee, MN RIVER BLUFF DEVELOPMENT INTHE CONTEXT ALONGTHE MINNESOTA RIVER IN DOWNTOWN SHAKOPEE (RENDERING PROVIDED BY CITY OF SHAKOPEE).

*A99-SITE PERSPECTIVE 17067

05/25/18

C 2018MOMENTUMDESIGNGROUP LLC

1

Introduction + Planning Process

1869BIRD’S EYEVIEWSKETCHOFTHECITYOF SHAKOPEE

22

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

HISTORY

1600-1700 For hundreds of years, the Mdewakanton Dakota people made this area their home. The precise date of their arrival is unclear, but it is estimated to be in the early 17th century, likely around the 1600s. They lived off the land by hunting large game animals, fishing from the Minnesota River, and harvesting wild rice and other crops. Many burial mounds and other types of earth work were created during this ‘Woodland Tradition’ time period (1630-1700). The Minnesota River Valley is home to the highest concentration of historic earthworks in the state of Minnesota. Today, some historic burial mounds are still visible, especially in present day Memorial Park. There is evidence of other mounds that have not been properly preserved and were disturbed by post-contact development. The first contact between the Dakota people and non-Native Americans occurred in the mid 1600s. By 1700, European settlers began to move into the area and marked a shift in the region known as the Contact Period.

With its location within the Lower Minnesota River Valley, the City of Shakopee and the surrounding regions have served as a home for humans for thousands of years. The history of Shakopee is intimately tied to the history of the Dakota people. Before it was officially incorporated as a city on May 23, 1857, and before it became a trading post and a small river town, this area along the banks of the Minnesota River was home to the Mdewakanton Dakota and their village Tinta Otonwe. There is evidence that humans may have inhabited the Midwest Region as far back as 8,000-12,000 years ago. Known as the Paleo-Indian Tradition, traces of this period can be found in occasional spearheads discovered in the area. Furthermore, some of the extant burial mounds found in the region are believed to be between 500 and 2,000 years old.

23

1700-1850 From 1700 to 1850, Shakopee’s physical and cultural landscape saw dramatic shifts. During this time, the Mdewakanton Dakota established their village, Tinta Otonwe, along the banks of the Minnesota River, which grew to be one of the largest Dakota villages along the lower river valley. Population estimates for Tinta Otonwe vary but may have reached 600 people at its peak. The village was led by a lineage of leaders known as Chief Sakpe (meaning “Six”). These Chiefs would eventually become the namesake for the City of Shakopee.

1

At various points throughout its existence, the primary village of Tinta Otonwe was located on both the north and south side of the river. The economy of the Dakota village was seasonal and rotated between agriculture, hunting, and gathering. The area was primarily farmed for corn and some of the surrounding lakes were used for harvesting wild rice. Additionally, European fur traders and explorers were also present in the area as far back as the late 1600s. In 1839, Oliver Faribault, a trader and farmer, was assigned by the United States government to teach the Dakota people modern agricultural techniques. He established a cabin and trading post in Tinta Otonwe, thought to be one of the first permanent Euro- American residences in Shakopee. In 1847, a missionary named Samuel W. Pond came to the region after being invited by Chief Sakpe II. Pond’s goal was to establish a school at the Tinta Otonwe village. Pond learned the Dakota language and fostered a positive relationship with the Dakota people. As a result, Pond was instrumental in helping write down and preserve the Dakota language.

Introduction + Planning Process

ARTIST SETH EASTMAN’S PAINTINGS OF DAKOTAVILLAGES FROMTHEMID-1800’S, IMAGES COURTESY OF THE OF MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION

POND’S HISTORIC MILL, STILL STANDING IN ITS ORIGINAL LOCATION TODAY

24

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

1850-1950 A dramatic shift happened in 1851, when the Mendota Treaty was signed between the Mdewakanton and Wahpekute Dakota people and the United States Federal Government. Under this treaty, and the Treaty of Traverse des Sioux, which was signed the same year, ownership of Dakota land was transferred to the United States government, opening up millions of acres of land for settlement and colonization by Europeans and Americans. The Dakota people were forced to move to nearby reservation land in 1853, but frequently made trips back to Tinta Otonwe through the 1860s. With the land now open for settlement, the region began to grow rapidly. In the early 1850s, Thomas A. Holmes established a trading post near the Dakota village, and mapped out a plan for “Shakopay Village”, naming the area after Chief Sakpe II. Holmes is now credited with founding the City of Shakopee (see chapter 4 for further information). The city was formally incorporated in 1857 but lost its status a few years later due to odd legislation but was able to reincorporate again in 1870. In the early years of the City’s growth, steamboats and the railroad were important methods of transportation and economic growth. Steamboats came up the Minnesota River and carried both people and goods to the City of Shakopee. These twin transportation routes helped keep the City of Shakopee’s economy strong and growing during the late 1800s. The City also benefited from a strong brick and limestone industry. As the city transitioned into the early 1900s, electricity and water infrastructure were formalized, allowing for more development and an increasing population. As the economy grew, new businesses began to appear such as flour mills, breweries, and creameries. In 1927, the Holmes Street Bridge was constructed and connected Shakopee with Chaska. Increased job opportunities supported a growing population and by the late 1930s, the population of Shakopee reached over 2,400 people.

AERIAL VIEW OF SHAKOPEE, 1909

THE RED WING ON THE MINNESOTA RIVER

THE SHAKOPEE RAIL, 1865

25

1

Introduction + Planning Process

1950-PRESENT By the mid-20th century, the city continued to invest in improvements. In addition to growing civic services, economic growth was encouraged with the development of industrial park facilities. Shakopee’s population growth continued to climb, reaching over 7,700 by the 1970s. The 1970s and 1980s were important for the establishment of Shakopee’s entertainment industry. Murphy’s Landing (now knows as “The Landing” and operated by Three Rivers Parks District) opened in 1969 on the site of one of the original ferry landings. Valleyfair Amusement Park opened in 1976, garnering a lot of regional and national attention for the city. Canterbury Downs (now called Canterbury Park), a horse-racing track opened in 1985 and brought even more attention to the city. In the 1995, the Bloomington Ferry Bridge was opened, helping connect the City of Shakopee to the larger metro area. With this vehicle connection, the city’s population increased rapidly, reaching over 37,000 people by 2010. Today’s estimated population is over 40,000 people. Continuing to expand, Shakopee has entered into agreements to begin the annexation process of the neighboring Jackson Township. Soon, the City’s limits, development, and population will have another boom. The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is today greatly involved in City ongoings, granting funds for various improvement projects and maintaining property that they own within the City.

HIGH WATER MARK, 1952

HOLMES STREET BRIDGE

26

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

PARALLEL PROCESSES

Through the development process of this Parks and Trails Master Plan, the City and hired consultant team has also been working hand-in-hand with the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC) on a Riverfront Master Plan and concept plan for Memorial Park and The Landing. The full scope of this project includes the west to east region along the Minnesota River from Huber Park to The Landing, and the north to south swath from the Minnesota River’s Shakopee banks to resources identified just over Highway 101. The goals of the SMSC Riverfront Master Plan share a similar mission and vision with the City of Shakopee’s Parks, Trails, and Recreation Master Plan and reflect the desire for collaboration towards a shared goal of celebrating, enriching, and respecting the history and cultural resources in Shakopee. Because this is a parallel process, the timeline for the SMSC Riverfront Master Plan is similar but not exactly the same as the Parks, Trails, and Recreation Master plan, and will be included into this document when it is fully complete and approved by all groups. This parallel process reflects the recognition of the significant cultural resources in this area. These resources and their associated history have routinely been ignored and degraded. The purpose for this process is to intentionally increase awareness of these resources and to create a comprehensive plan that respects and honors all of Shakopee’s history and residents.

27

The Shakopee Parks and Trails Master Plan process unfolded through a series of stages, shown in the adjacent diagram. These stages were envisioned at the beginning of the process, but adjusted and flexed based on the needs and suggestions of the community. PARKS AND TRAILS STEERING COMMITTEE A committee made up of Parks and Trails Advisory Board members, city staff, City Council members, and city residents and business owners provided input on vision, priorities, recommendation review and overall sounding board for the Master Plan. ROLE OF STAFF Staff provided extensive work in contributing to the document, providing data and past work, and review. CONSULTANT TEAM The Master Plan was developed by a consultant planning team lead by Confluence Inc., with the support of PROS Consulting, Putting Change in Motion, and in partnership with city staff and leadership. MASTER PLAN PROCESS

28 SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | INTRODUCTION + PLANNING PROCESSES

USING THE PLAN The Parks, Trails, and Recreation Master Plan serves as a vision and framework for Shakopee’s next 20 years. The plan is a living document and will continue to be re-evaluated and modified by city staff and leadership as situations change and opportunities become available. The following document provides a direction to guide decisions in the future. NEEDS ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY PRIORITIES, RESEARCH, & TECHNICAL ANALYSIS FINDINGS MAPPING INPUT

COMMUNITY PRIORITIES, RESEARCH, & TECHNICAL ANALYSIS FINDINGS

NEEDS ASSESSMENT

INPUT

MAPPING

GOALS PARKS BIG IDEAS

GOALS PARKS BIG IDEAS

STRATEGIES THEMES

STRATEGIES THEMES

VISION

VISION

COMMUNITY, CITY COUNCIL & STAFF DECISIONS, REGIONAL COLLABORATION

COMMUNITY, CITY COUNCIL & STAFF DECISIONS, REGIONAL COLLABORATION

PARTNERSHIPS

PARTNERSHIPS

ACTION

ACTION

PROGRAMS OPERATIONS & MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION PROJECTS & ACTIONS CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS POLICIES

PROGRAMS OPERATIONS & MANAGEMENT COMMUNICATION PROJECTS & ACTIONS CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS POLICIES

OUTCOMES

OUTCOMES

29

This page was intentionally left blank

30 SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | NEEDS ASSESSMENT

NEEDS ASSESSMENT

» » DEMOGRAPHICS ANALYSIS » » TRENDS ANALYSIS » » COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY » » MINORITY POPULATION ENGAGEMENT REPORT » » BENCHMARK ANALYSIS » » RECREATION PROGRAM ASSESSMENT » » LEVEL OF SERVICE STANDARDS SECTION CONTENTS:

31

2

Needs Assessment

This page was intentionally left blank

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | NEEDS ASSESSMENT 32

DEMOGRAPHICS ANALYSIS The City of Shakopee selected PROS Consulting to assist Confluence in completing a Master Plan for the City’s parks, trails, and recreation system. The plan provides a short and long-term planning and implementation guidance for the City’s capital improvements, acquisitions, and development to create a parks and recreation system that meets the needs of Shakopee’s residents and businesses. A key component of this Master Plan is a Demographics and Recreational Trends Analysis which provides a thorough understanding of the current demographic makeup and projected shifts in the local population, as well as national, regional, and local recreational trends.

DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS The Demographic Analysis describes the population within Shakopee, Minnesota. This analysis is reflective of the total population and its key characteristics such as age segments, income levels, race, and ethnicity. The City’s demographic figures are then compared to the state and national populations. This type of analysis allows Shakopee to see how their population compares on a local and national scale. It is important to note that future projections are based on historical patterns and unforeseen circumstances during or after the time of the analysis could have a significant bearing on the validity of the projected figures.

2018 14,240 TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS

2018 41,947 TOTAL POPULATION

2018

2018 $87,562 MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

2018 71%

34.1 MEDIAN AGE

RACE

WHITE

FIGURE 2-1: DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS SNAPSHOT. INFORMATION OBTAINED FROM ESRI.

33

METHODOLOGY Demographic data used for the analysis was obtained from U.S. Census Bureau and from Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI), the largest research and development organization dedicated to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and specializing in population projections and market trends. All data was acquired in November

2018 and reflects actual numbers as reported in the 2010 Census as well as estimates for 2018 and 2023 as calculated by ESRI. Straight line linear regression was utilized for 2028 and 2033 projections. The City’s boundaries shown below were utilized for the demographic analysis. (See Figure 2-2)

2

Needs Assessment

Eden Prairie

Bloomington

Shakopee

Chaska

Jackson

Savage

Jackson

Louisville

Prior Lake

Municipal Boundary

Possible City Annexation

Proposed Initial Annexation

FIGURE 2-2: SHAKOPEE CITY BOUNDARIES

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | NEEDS ASSESSMENT 34

RACE AND ETHNICITY DEFINITIONS The minimum categories for data on race and ethnicity for Federal statistics, program administrative reporting, and civil rights compliance reporting are defined as below. The Census 2010 data on race are not directly comparable with data from the 2000 Census and earlier censuses; therefore, caution must be used when interpreting changes in the racial composition of the US population over time. The latest (Census 2010) definitions and nomenclature are used within this analysis.

» » American Indian – This includes a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment » » Asian – This includes a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam » » Black – This includes a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa » » Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander – This includes a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands » » White – This includes a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa » » Hispanic or Latino – This is an ethnic distinction, a subset of a race as defined by the Federal Government; this includes a person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race Please Note: The Census Bureau defines Race as a person’s self- identification with one or more of the following social groups: White, Black or African American, Asian, American Indian and Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, some other race, or a combination of these. While Ethnicity is defined as whether a person is of Hispanic / Latino origin or not. For this reason, the Hispanic / Latino ethnicity is viewed separate from race throughout this demographic analysis.

35

TOTAL POPULATION + AVERAGE ANNUAL GROWTH

POPULATION Shakopee’s population experienced steady growth of 1.64% per year (13.13% from 2010-2018), which is almost double the national growth rate of 0.86% annually over the same period. Similar to the population, the total number of households also experienced an increase in recent years (11.49% since 2010). Currently, the population is estimated at 41,947 individuals living within 14,240 households. Projecting ahead, the total population and total number of households are both expected to continue growing over the next 15 years at a comparable rate as years past. Based on 2033 predictions, the City is expected to have 51,881 residents living within 17,332 households. (See Figures 2-3 & 2-4)

2

Needs Assessment

Shakopee Population

Average Annual Growth (%)

FIGURE 2-3: TOTAL POPULATION

TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS + AVERAGE ANNUAL GROWTH

Shakopee Households

Average Annual Growth (%)

FIGURE 2-4: TOTAL NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS

SHAKOPEE PARKS, TRAILS, AND RECREATION MASTER PLAN | NEEDS ASSESSMENT 36

AGE SEGMENT Evaluating the City by age segments, the population is relatively young, with a median age of 34.1 years old which is below the US median age of 38.3 years. Assessing the population as a whole, the City is projected to experience a slight aging trend. Over the next 15 years, the 55+ population is expected to grow an additional 4% to represent approximately 21% of the City’s total population. This is largely due to the increased life expectancies and the remainder of the Baby Boomer generation shifting into the senior age groups. (See Figure 2-5). Due to the continued growth and longevity of the older population and the increase in the rate of participation and intensity level of recreational activities for the 55+ segment, it is important to give consideration for the “Senior” population beyond the traditional 55+ designation. Within the field of parks and recreation, there are two commonly used ways to partition this age segment. One is to simply segment by age: 55-64, 65-74, and 75+. However, as these age segments are engaged in programming, the variability of health and wellness can be a more relevant factor. For example, a 55-year-old may be struggling with rheumatoid arthritis and need different recreational opportunities than a healthy 65-year old who is running marathons once a year. Therefore, it may be more useful to divide programming for the older age segments into “Active,” “Low-Impact,” and/ or “Social” Seniors.

POPULATION BY AGE SEGMENT

75+ Years 55-74 Years 35-54 Years 18-34 Years 0-17 Years

FIGURE 2-5: POPULATION BY AGE SEGMENTS

37

Made with FlippingBook - professional solution for displaying marketing and sales documents online